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Tuesday, April 29
 

8:00am

9:00am

Keynote: Scaling Android at the Speed of Mobility - Mark Skarpness, Intel
A key industry challenge for Android device manufacturers is to quickly and efficiently develop and deliver high quality Android devices using the latest software releases and hardware platforms. Yet the proliferation of platforms and versions can be a nightmare for manageability, services, and applications. Add the introduction of 64-bit to the mix and the need for a well thought out approach to systems, apps and tools is paramount. Intel is offering tools and developer programs designed around the issues device developers face.  Beyond delivering a single device, we have also been focused on how to efficiently scale Android across a broad range of platforms needed for the many device types, and how to scale the software development tools as well. Finally, whether you need 1 or 1000 apps, we’ve been working on the best ways to enable Android application developers to efficiently deliver highly optimized applications across IA and other platforms.

Speakers
avatar for Mark Skarpness

Mark Skarpness

Intel Corporation
Mark is the Director of Systems Engineering in the Open Source Technology Center at Intel.  His team is responsible for integration, release engineering, distribution infrastructure, security, and quality assurance for Android, Tizen, and Yocto. Mark has held a variety of technical, marketing, and management positions during his twenty years with Intel.  Mark spent his first seven years at Intel as a software engineer and architect... Read More →


Tuesday April 29, 2014 9:00am - 9:30am
San Jose Ballroom

9:30am

Keynote: The Paradox of embedded and Open Source - Tim Bird, Sony Mobile
Linux has taken the embedded world by storm.  Billions (with a 'B') of devices have now shipped with a Linux kernel, and it seems unstoppable.  But will the next 10 billion devices ship with Linux or with something else?  How can Linux be specialized for deeply embedded projects, as characterized by the Internet of Things, while still maintaining the network effects of community
cooperation and sharing?  Is this possible or even desirable?  The startling truth might be revealed at this keynote.  Or, Tim might just rant a bit about device-tree... who knows?

Speakers
avatar for Tim Bird

Tim Bird

Senior Software Engeineer, Sony Mobile
Tim Bird is a Senior Staff Software Engineer for Sony Corporation, where he helps Sony improve the Linux kernel for use in Sony's products. Tim is also the Chair of the Architecture Group of the CE Working Group of the Linux Foundation. Tim has been working with Linux for over 20 years and has spoken at numerous events, include almost all Embedded Linux Conferences, and many LinuxCon events.


Tuesday April 29, 2014 9:30am - 10:00am
San Jose Ballroom

10:00am

Coffee Break
Tuesday April 29, 2014 10:00am - 10:30am
San Jose Ballroom Foyer

10:30am

A Deep Dive Into DEX File Format - Rodrigo Chiossi, Intel Open Source Technology Center
Even though Android has the spotlight of mobile research, little has been said about its unique file format, the Dalvik Executable. DEX, as it is known, is a file format developed to encapsulate the bytecode of Android applications. It is a unique combination of concepts borrowed from other file formats, such as DWARF debug format, into a highly optimized executable format with a small memory footprint. The contents of this talk are based on the development of the Dexterity library, an open source library for DEX instrumentation. It will describe the internals of the Dalvik Executable as well as techniques for direct manipulation of its binaries, which is a requirement for analysis, optimization, obfuscation and many other applications. It will also talk about the main limitations of DEX and the key concepts needed for porting the format to 64bit architectures.

Speakers
avatar for Rodrigo Chiossi

Rodrigo Chiossi

Engineer, Intel
Rodrigo Chiossi is an engineer at Intel Open Source Technology Center in Campinas, Brazil. He has extensive work in the Android platform, working for multiple vendors over the years (Motorola/Samsung/Intel) and maintaining multiple open source related projects, such as AndroidXRef and the dexterity library. Besides Android, his current work is focused on development for embedded platforms, like the Minnowboard MAX, and communication protocols for... Read More →


Tuesday April 29, 2014 10:30am - 11:20am
Willow Glen II/III

10:30am

Extending Android via External Microprocessors - Mike Anderson, PTR Group
Android's sensor framework is great for a number of sensors that you typically fins in a mobile device.  But, what if you want to add I2C or SPI-based peripherals without modifying libsensors and rebuilding the AOSP sources?  How would you use Android to generate a PWM signal for motor control or you wanted to get an interrupt into the handset from the outside world?  This session will discuss extending Android beyond the handset into the realm of hard real-time control through the use of external microprocessors such as the ARM Cortex M3/M4, AVR and PIC32 series CPUs.  We will discuss various techniques to interface mobile Android devices to external microcontrollers for both input and output control of real-world devices.

Speakers
avatar for Michael E Anderson

Michael E Anderson

Chief Scientist, The PTR Group, inc.
Mike Anderson is currently CTO and Chief Scientist for The PTR Group, Inc. With over 39 years in the embedded and real-time computing industry, Mike works with a number of RTOS, Linux and Android-based devices in applications ranging from satellites and robotics to SCADA platforms. However, his focus over the past few years has been the use of Linux and Android in embedded sensor applications and the deployment of the Internet of Things.


Tuesday April 29, 2014 10:30am - 11:20am
Blossom Hill I & II

10:30am

LTSI Project Update for 3.10 Kernel and Future Plan - Hisao Munakata, Renesas Electronics & Tsugikazu Shibata, NEC
LTSI is a Linux Foundation project that develops kernel for the industry use. It is based on LTS (long term stable) kernel and integrated (backport and verified) attractive new features already available in newer version kernel. We have released 3.10-LTSI kernel with a great numbers of contribution from a company like Collabora, Intel, Renesas and Toshiba. I will introduce status summary of LTSI-3.10. Also, we have established automated kernel test environment to validate if there is any regression in LTSI kernel against community LTS kernel. This was our first attempt to do automated validation, and we are hoping enhance it to add more value to the Linux user not limited to the LTSI adopter. I will introduce how it works and how you can utilize LTSI and auto test environment. Finally, I will introduce LTSI project plan for 2014 season so that you can create your plan for the future.

Speakers
avatar for Hisao Munakata

Hisao Munakata

executive manager, Renesas
Munakata leads upstream kernel development team in Renesas to encourage developer to send more patched to the upstream. Also he actively works for Linux Foundation CE working. Automotive Grade Linux and other Linux Foundation project for the long time. He did various presentation, keynote and BoFs at various Linux Foundation and other conferences.
TS

Tsugikazu Shibata

NEC
Tsugikazu Shibata of NEC, platinum LF member company, is LTSI project lead, and he has been supporting both enterprise and embedded use of Open Source. He also did various talk at LF events including keynote talk.


Tuesday April 29, 2014 10:30am - 11:20am
Salon IV

10:30am

microYocto and the 'Internet of Tiny' - Tom Zanussi, Intel's Open Source Technology Center
The past year has seen a remarkable growth of interest in super-low-power and super-low-form-factor computing, in the form of 'wearables', the 'Internet of Things', and the release of exciting new hardware such as Intel's Quark and Edison SoCs. Taking advantage of this super-small hardware also implies the need for super-small operating systems and applications to match. This talk will describe a super-small-footprint Linux distribution called 'microYocto''. The main focus will be the kernel and how we achieved what we think is close to the minimal possible kernel footprint, both in terms of static text size and dynamic memory usage. We'll talk about the tools and methodologies we used and developed to analyze the problem, such as tracing and machine simulation, and will describe the various technologies developed and applied to achieving this minimalistic system.

Speakers
TZ

Tom Zanussi

Software Engineer, Intel
Tom Zanussi is a software engineer at Intel's Open Source Technology Center, working on embedded systems with the Yocto Project. He's given talks on the subjects of embedded systems and tracing at various conferences in the past including ELC, OLS and the Intelligent Systems Conference, and has been an active contributor to the Linux kernel focusing on various areas within tracing and perf.


Tuesday April 29, 2014 10:30am - 11:20am
Salon I/II

10:30am

USB and the Real World - Alan Ott, Signal 11 Software
The Linux kernel provides a robust implementation of both the host and device side of USB. While we can all easily quote the theoretical throughput of each USB speed defined by the specifications, the numbers can be quite different in practice, with variation due to the device class and implementation, the format and structure of user data, and the implementations of both the driver and userspace software running on both the device and host. This presentation will explore some of the common pitfalls of USB software on both the device and host sides as it relates to performance and will show some techniques to maximize throughput. Analysis will be performed using several different USB device controllers. A USB hardware analyzer and ftrace with kernelshark will be used to find performance bottlenecks on both the the kernel and userspace sides in an interactive demonstration.

Speakers
avatar for Alan Ott

Alan Ott

Linux Architect, SoftIron
Alan started programming when he was four years old on his dad's Commodore 64 and began using Linux in the mid-90s while in high school. He currently works for SoftrIron, a Silicon Valley startup making ARM-based appliances for the data center. Alan is the creator and maintainer of M-Stack, a free and open source USB device stack for PIC micocontrollers, and HIDAPI, a cross-platform host-side USB HID library; and is a contributor to the Linux... Read More →


Tuesday April 29, 2014 10:30am - 11:20am
Salon III

11:30am

Finding Performance and Power Issues on Android Systems - Eric Moore, Intel Corporation
In this presentation I will showcase various technologies from Google and from Intel Corporation to identify and fix performance and power issues on Android Systems, and what developers and testers need to look for in their systems and applications. I will show how various microkernels look inside the tools, and then talk about some real world cases.

Speakers
EM

Eric Moore

Senior Technical Consulting Engineer, Intel Corporation
Eric Wynne Moore is a Senior Technical Consulting Engineer working in the Performance Analysis and Testing group within the Developer Products Division at Intel Corporation. In the past, he has worked in the Intel Compiler Group, Intel Software College, Rational, Microsoft, RealNetworks, Digital/Compaq, and Keane. His specialties include power and performance tuning, threading, compilers, CPU architecture, operating systems, mobile computing... Read More →


Tuesday April 29, 2014 11:30am - 12:20pm
Blossom Hill I & II

11:30am

Running Code in the Android Stack - Karim Yaghmour, Opersys
The Android stack is huge, by any standard. There are many subsystems, many layers, and many abstractions. Yet, only one very specific set of its layers is documented: the Android app developer API. Still, there are dozens of ways to get code to run in the Android stack, most of which are undocumented or require a firm understanding of the platform's internals. This talk will go through the various ways to get code to run in the Android stack and explain the pros and cons of each method. From shell scripts to system services, we'll cover the persistent flag, generating custom SDK add-ons, creating command-line Java applications, running native daemons and launching shell commands from standard apps.

Speakers
avatar for Karim Yaghmou

Karim Yaghmou

CEO, Opersys inc.
Karim is part serial entrepreneur, part unrepentant geek. He's most widely know for his O'Reilly books: "Building Embedded Linux Systems" and "Embedded Android". As an active member of the open source community since the mid-90's, he pioneered the world of Linux tracing with the Linux Trace Toolkit and introduced Adeos, one of the first nanokernels/hypervisors for Linux. As part of his work, he's had the privilege of working with teams from a... Read More →


Tuesday April 29, 2014 11:30am - 12:20pm
Willow Glen II/III

11:30am

Mastering the DMA and IOMMU APIs - Laurent Pinchart, Renesas Linux Kernel Team
The DMA and IOMMU APIs receive too little love. Developers usually expect DMA memory management to just work and are not aware of the crucial importance of handling all details correctly. This results in reliability, portability, maintainability and performance issues, especially in embedded systems. This talk will describe the problems that the DMA API addresses and explain how to solve them with practical examples. Cache management, device tree support, CMA and IOMMU integration will be explained, and tips to address performance issues will be presented. If the audience shows interest for the topic the shortcomings of the APIs will also be discussed and attendees' feedback be recorded to serve as a base to develop future enhancements.

Speakers
avatar for Laurent Pinchart

Laurent Pinchart

Ideas on board, Ideas on board
Laurent Pinchart has been a Linux kernel developer since 2001. He has written media-related Linux drivers for consumer and embedded devices and is one of the V4L core developers. Laurent is the founder and owner of Ideas on Board, a company specialized in embedded Linux design and development. He has given | Linux kernel-related talks at the FOSDEM, LPC and ELC. He currently works with the Renesas Linux kernel team where he develops a wide... Read More →


Tuesday April 29, 2014 11:30am - 12:20pm
Salon I/II

11:30am

Qt5 & Yocto - adding SDK and easy app migration from Qt4 - Denys Dmytriyenko, Texas Instruments
OpenEmbedded and the Yocto Project always had Qt4 libraries, tools and sample applications integrated in its core layer. Qt5 is the new major version of this popular toolkit and it was being adopted early on in OE via meta-qt5 layer, with more advanced features and uses cases being added recently.

In this presentation we'll quickly cover the basics of Qt5 integration in the Yocto Project by bundling toolkit libraries and examples into the root file system. Then we'll proceed into more advanced topics:
* building a standalone host SDK for development and cross-compilation of Qt5 applications outside of the OE/Yocto workflow
* modifying old Qt4-based application recipes to support both existing Qt4 and new Qt5 with seamless switching between the toolkits with minimal changes
* utilizing some platform-specific 3D and graphics acceleration, such as GLES on TI SoCs.

Speakers
avatar for Denys Dmytriyenko

Denys Dmytriyenko

Texas Instruments
Denys has worked for Texas Instruments for over 12 years and had been involved in developing numerous Linux-powered embedded devices and products, ranging from DSL/Cable modems, Network routers, VoIP adapters to media and security platforms built on MIPS and ARM architectures. In recent years Denys led development of the Arago Project - an in-house unified SDK framework, based on OpenEmbedded and the Yocto Project, for TI DaVinci, Sitara and OMAP... Read More →


Tuesday April 29, 2014 11:30am - 12:20pm
Salon III

11:30am

Update on Boot Time Reduction Techniques, with Figures - Michael Opdenacker, Free Electrons
Many community resources exist about boot time reduction. However, few of them are up to date and share the exact time savings that can be achieved on recent systems. This talk will detail today's most efficient techniques to reduce boot time. For each of them, figures will be shared, obtained from recent boot time reduction projects and from the preparation of Free Electrons new workshop on this topic. If you attend this talk, you will know which optimization techniques are worth using first, and will save time not exploring techniques that won't make a significant difference in your project. Don't tell your boss, and this will leave your more time to contribute to community projects!

Speakers
avatar for Michael Opdenacker

Michael Opdenacker

CEO, Free Electrons
Michael Opdenacker is the founder of Free Electrons, a company offering development, consulting and training services to embedded Linux system developers worldwide. We get paid to maximize Linux' world domination!


Tuesday April 29, 2014 11:30am - 12:20pm
Salon IV

12:20pm

Lunch Break
Tuesday April 29, 2014 12:20pm - 2:00pm
On Your Own

2:00pm

The Android Graphics Path, In-Depth - Chris Simmonds, 2net
In this talk I describe the internal workings of the Android graphics stack from the Application layer down through the stack to pixels on the screen. It is a fairly complex journey, taking in two different 2D rendering engines, applications calling OpenGL ES directory, passing buffers on to the system compositor, Surface Flinger, and then down to the display controller or frame buffer. All this requires careful synchronisation so that what appears on the screen is smooth, without jitter, and makes efficient use of memory, CPU, GPU and power resources.

Speakers
avatar for Chris Simmonds

Chris Simmonds

Consultant, 2net
Chris Simmonds is a freelance consultant and trainer who has been using Linux in embedded systems for over 15 years. He is the author of the book “Mastering Embedded Linux Programming”, and is a frequent presenter at open source and embedded conferences, including the Embedded Linux Conference and Embedded World. He has been running training courses in embedded Linux since 2002 and has delivered hundreds of sessions to many well-known... Read More →


Tuesday April 29, 2014 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Blossom Hill I & II

2:00pm

The Android Media Framework - A Deep Dive - Bert Van Dam, TPVision
The android media framework is a major area of focus for anyone building an Android device. This presentation will explain the architecture and functioning of the Android media framework. It will also explain the steps involved in extending the Android media framework in order to support new codecs, container formats and DRM systems. The presentation will further explain the common problems encountered in doing this and the solutions as handled by TPVision.

Speakers
BV

Bert Van Dam

Software Architect, TPVision
Bert is part of the Advanced Development team of TPVision working on next generation Smart TV features for Philips Televisions. Most recently, he has been working on building the first Android based Philips Televisions for the European market.


Tuesday April 29, 2014 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Willow Glen II/III

2:00pm

Device Tree for Dummies - Thomas Petazzoni, Free Electrons
The conversion of the ARM Linux kernel over to the Device Tree as the mechanism to describe the hardware has been a significant change for ARM kernel developers. Nowadays, all developers porting the Linux kernel on new ARM platforms, either new SOCs or new boards, have to work with the Device Tree. Based on practical examples, this talk intends to provide a ""getting started guide"" for newcomers in the Device Tree world: what is the Device Tree? How is it written and compiled? How do the bootloader and kernel interact? How are Device Tree bindings written and documented? What are the best practices for writing Device Trees and their bindings?

Speakers
avatar for Thomas Petazzoni

Thomas Petazzoni

CTO and Embedded Linux Engineer, Free Electrons
Thomas Petazzoni is CTO and embedded Linux engineer at Free Electrons. He contributes to the support of Marvell ARM processors in the Linux kernel, and is a major contributor to the Buildroot embedded Linux build system. As part of his Buildroot work, Thomas has done extensive contributions to the code building cross-compilation toolchains and the code importing existing cross-compilation toolchains in Buildroot.


Tuesday April 29, 2014 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Salon I/II

2:00pm

User Space Drivers in Linux – Pros, Cons, and Implementation Issues - Michael Christofferson, Enea
Linux has a well-established foundation for implementation of device drivers in the kernel. For high-end performance - interrupt latency and throughput – there has been much recent focus on user space driver implementations. Linux kernel drivers have issues like syscall overhead, interrupt latency, debugging (different tools for kernel debug vs user space debug), language options, etc. User space drivers potentially offer better interrupt latency and throughput, but at some serious cost. Interrupt handling, DMA, device interdependencies (bridged devices), access to kernel services, and multiple client access are but a few of the issues for a user space driver. This presentation will review these issues and report some results from real studies. In summary, there will be a discussion on Intel’s DPDK, Freescale’s USDPAA, TI’s TransportnetLib, and Linaro’s ODP regarding this topic.


Tuesday April 29, 2014 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Salon IV

2:00pm

Using Yocto For Modules Manufacturers - Alexandre Belloni, Free Electrons
Yocto has an alleged steep learning curve. It can be a challenge for modules and evaluation board manufacturers to add support for their devices in Yocto as they don't necessarily have a software background. This talk will highlight the steps required, techniques and good practices to create a well integrated machine configuration allowing to build images using the Yocto Linux build system. The Crystalfontz support from meta-fsl-arm-extra will be used to illustrate the talk.

Speakers
avatar for Alexandre Belloni

Alexandre Belloni

Embedded Linux, Kernel and Android engineer, Free Electrons
Alexandre joined Free Electrons in 2013, a company offering development, consulting and training services to embedded Linux system developers worldwide. He has been working on embedded systems since 2005, mostly Linux on ARM but also MIPS and x86 and so contributes to the usual projects part of the embedded Linux ecosystem: Barebox, u-boot, Buildroot, Yocto Project and the kernel. Alexandre is now the co-maintainer of the Atmel ARM SoCs support... Read More →


Tuesday April 29, 2014 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Salon III

3:00pm

Android without Java - Bernhard Rosenkränzer, Linaro
It is widely believed that Android app development has to be done in Java -- but this is not true. Aside from using JNI, there are some interesting, but not very well documented, helpers that allow writing apps without having to touch Java.

This session will explain how to write Android apps in different programming languages -- such as C, C++ and Objective-C -- any touches on why you may want to do such a thing even though Java on Android is good.

Developers who want to develop Android apps in languages other than Java - whether this is for porting (porting an Objective-C application from that other mobile OS may be easier than you think...), using a pre-existing library that doesn't have reasonable Java bindings, or simply because of personal preference.

This will help people understand how (and that) they can develop Android applications without having to use Java - this will help porting applications from other operating systems as well as bringing in developers who are interested in mobile devices, but don't like Java.  

Tuesday April 29, 2014 3:00pm - 3:50pm
Willow Glen II/III

3:00pm

Improving Performance of Key External Projects Used in Android - Khasim Syed Mohammed, Linaro
In an Android distribution, there are more than 150 external community projects (the “external” folder) that are used to address key software and tools requirements for Android mobile. These projects are common for both Android and other Linux distributions and are generically maintained by not depending directly on any SOC specific hardware accelerator feature. The Android user experience also depends on some of these projects, for example: SQLite. At Linaro we have analyzed these external projects and are in the process of improving few of these projects for better performance on Android mobile. We would like to leverage this opportunity to meet with the Android community and review our analysis, discuss more new possibilities, share experiences and finally find a common forum where we could discuss these issues further and try to find portable solutions and upstream.

Speakers
avatar for Khasim Syed Mohammed

Khasim Syed Mohammed

Tech Lead for Android Engineering, Linaro
Khasim Syed Mohammed is Tech Lead for Android Engineering at Linaro. At Linaro, he and his team are involved in enabling Android on next generation ARM architecture, solving shared and legacy problems in Android for ARM SOCs and finding out performance bottlenecks in Android and address the same with generic solution. Khasim has more than 12 years of rich experience on Linux distributions, Kernel & device drivers for ARM SoCs. Before joining... Read More →


Tuesday April 29, 2014 3:00pm - 3:50pm
Blossom Hill I & II

3:00pm

How to Build a Linux-Based Robot - Michael E Anderson, The PTR Group, Inc.
Linux-based platforms such as the Beaglebone and Raspberry Pi are inexpensive powerhouses. But, beyond being cool on their own, what else can you do with them? This presentation will step you through the process of building a Wi-Fi enabled, Linux-based robot that you can build without breaking the bank and without special knowledge of robotics and robotic controls.

Speakers
avatar for Michael E Anderson

Michael E Anderson

Chief Scientist, The PTR Group, inc.
Mike Anderson is currently CTO and Chief Scientist for The PTR Group, Inc. With over 39 years in the embedded and real-time computing industry, Mike works with a number of RTOS, Linux and Android-based devices in applications ranging from satellites and robotics to SCADA platforms. However, his focus over the past few years has been the use of Linux and Android in embedded sensor applications and the deployment of the Internet of Things.


Tuesday April 29, 2014 3:00pm - 3:50pm
Salon I/II

3:00pm

Using Real-Time Patch with LTSI Kernel - Yoshitake Kobayashi, Toshiba
The LTSI kernel has a high degree of usability for embedded systems. However lack of real-time extension makes it difficult to adapt LTSI to control systems. We made LTSI kernel with RT patch (LTSI-RT) to follow the LTS kernel and are evaluating it on several boards. This presentation shows requirement and issues to make LTSI-RT. LTSI-RT is available on GitHub.

Speakers
YK

Yoshitake Kobayashi

Chief Specialist, TOSHIBA
Yoshitake Kobayashi joined Corporate Software Engineering Center, Toshiba Corporation in 2008. Before that he received his Ph.D. degree in computer science at University of Electro-Communications in 2002 and worked as an assistant professor. His research interests include operating systems, distributed systems and dynamically reconfigurable systems.


Tuesday April 29, 2014 3:00pm - 3:50pm
Salon IV

3:00pm

Yocto Project / OpenEmbedded BoF - Jeff Osier-Mixon, Intel Corporation
Got a question, comment, gripe, praise, or other communication for the Yocto Project and/or OpenEmbedded? Or maybe you'd just like to learn more about these projects and their influence on the world of embedded Linux? Feel free to join us for an informal BoF.

Speakers
avatar for Jeff Osier-Mixon

Jeff Osier-Mixon

Open Source Community Engineer, Intel Corporation / Yocto Project
Jefro works at Intel Corporation as the community manager for the Yocto Project. He has been involved in embedded Linux for many years, and regularly speaks at Linux conferences worldwide.


Tuesday April 29, 2014 3:00pm - 3:50pm
Salon III

3:50pm

4:20pm

Android without Java (Cont.) - Bernhard Rosenkränzer, Linaro
It is widely believed that Android app development has to be done in Java -- but this is not true. Aside from using JNI, there are some interesting, but not very well documented, helpers that allow writing apps without having to touch Java.

This session will explain how to write Android apps in different programming languages -- such as C, C++ and Objective-C -- any touches on why you may want to do such a thing even though Java on Android is good.

Developers who want to develop Android apps in languages other than Java - whether this is for porting (porting an Objective-C application from that other mobile OS may be easier than you think...), using a pre-existing library that doesn't have reasonable Java bindings, or simply because of personal preference.

This will help people understand how (and that) they can develop Android applications without having to use Java - this will help porting applications from other operating systems as well as bringing in developers who are interested in mobile devices, but don't like Java.  

Tuesday April 29, 2014 4:20pm - 5:10pm
Willow Glen II/III

4:20pm

X86 ROM Cooking 101: A Hands on Tutorial - Ron Munitz, Nubo
In this tutorial, you will have a hands-on journey of customizing and building Android right off the Android Open Source Project (AOSP).
We will begin with introducing the concepts of ROM cooking for any Android compatible device, and we we will then walk-through the build system of the AOSP. You will learn what Android is made of, how to build a bullet speed Android emulator, and how to build a minimal, fully operational Android configuration that will run on the QEMU virtual machine using the following components: Vanilla Android KitKat, Vanilla Linux Kernel, and a working QEMU. You will step out of the classroom with the ability to follow the exact steps made in the tutorial to jump-start building your own Android system for any Virtual Machine - and with the tools and knowledge to build it for any custom device!

Tuesday April 29, 2014 4:20pm - 5:10pm
Blossom Hill I & II

4:20pm

CE Workgroup (BoFs) - Moderated By Joe Kontur, Panasonic
In this BoFs, the CE Workgroup members will present the status of current projects, as well as ideas for new projects for the Workgroup to pursue.  Short presentations will be given by WG members, and ELC attendees are invited to join the discussion and make suggestions for future CEWG projects.

Speakers
JK

Joe Kontur

Director, Panasonic


Tuesday April 29, 2014 4:20pm - 5:10pm
Salon I/II

4:20pm

Making a Splash: Digital Signage Powered by MinnowBoard and the Yocto Project - John 'Warthog9' Hawley, Intel & Nitin Kamble, Intel
The use of digital signs has become commonplace anywhere dynamic information needs to be presented. As digital signage evolves, opportunities for greater interactivity are being explored to increase user engagement. This talk will describe the process of developing digital signage appliances and design issues to take into consideration when doing so. Using an example of a retail kiosk, the demo project models best practices when developing embedded Linux applications with the Yocto Project, and leverages the strengths of the open hardware MinnowBoard embedded computer.

Speakers
JW

John 'Warthog9' Hawley

John 'Warthog9' Hawley led the system administration team on kernel.org for nearly a decade, leading a team including four other administrators. He specifically worked on system operations, the wikis and the kernel.org Gitweb. His other exploits include working on Syslinux, OpenSSI, a caching Gitweb, and patches to bind to enable GeoDNS. He's the author of PXE Knife, a set of interfaces around common utilities and diagnostics tools needed by an... Read More →
NK

Nitin Kamble

Sr Software Engineer, Intel Corporation
Nitin Kamble is a software developer at Intel Corporation. He has been working on Open Source development since the early '90s. He has worked on Linux kernel development, Open Source Virtualization i.e. Xen & KVM before. Now he is working on the Yocto Project where he is maintaining many Intel BSPs along with other tasks. | | Previous Speaking Experience: | Nitin has presented at various open source conferences including OLS, Design... Read More →


Tuesday April 29, 2014 4:20pm - 5:10pm
Salon III

4:20pm

Supporting A New ARM platform: The Allwinner SoCs Example - Maxime Ripard, Free Electrons
Since last year, we have been working on supporting the SoCs from Allwinner, a chinese SoC vendor, in the mainline kernel. These SoCs are cheap, wide-spread, backed by a strong community and, until last year, only supported by an out-of-tree kernel. Through this talk, we would like to share the status of this effort: where we were a year ago, what solutions were in place, where we are currently, and what to expect from the future. We will also focus on the community around these SoCs, the work that is done there, etc.

Speakers
MR

Maxime Ripard

Embedded Linux Engineer, Free Electrons
Maxime Ripard is an embedded Linux engineer and trainer at Free Electrons since 2011. He is the maintainer of Allwinner ARM SoCs in the Linux kernel. He is also a regular contributor to various Free Software projects related to embedded Linux such as Barebox and Buildroot.


Tuesday April 29, 2014 4:20pm - 5:10pm
Salon IV

5:20pm

Headless Android Strikes Back - Gary Bisson, Adeneo Embedded
While Android use on embedded systems is indisputably growing, its main interest remains in the UI it offers. However, this OS also provides a great platform/application framework for devices without display (headless). Learn the how to create and use such a version of Android. A demonstration will be featured showing the OS capabilities using an ARM platform running KitKat.

Speakers
GB

Gary Bisson

Embedded software engineer, Adeneo Embedded
Gary Bisson has been working on embedded software development for several years in various industries (defense, multimedia, video games). He is now focusing on adapting Linux and Android to custom hardware as well as developing device drivers for different operating systems at the Adeneo Embedded office located in Bellevue, WA. | | Previous conferences: | ELC 2012: Useful USB Gadgets on Linux | ABS 2013: Leveraging the Android Accessory... Read More →


Tuesday April 29, 2014 5:20pm - 6:10pm
Willow Glen II/III

5:20pm

X86 ROM Cooking 101: A Hands on Tutorial (Cont.) - Ron Munitz, Nubo
In this tutorial, you will have a hands-on journey of customizing and building Android right off the Android Open Source Project (AOSP).
We will begin with introducing the concepts of ROM cooking for any Android compatible device, and we we will then walk-through the build system of the AOSP. You will learn what Android is made of, how to build a bullet speed Android emulator, and how to build a minimal, fully operational Android configuration that will run on the QEMU virtual machine using the following components: Vanilla Android KitKat, Vanilla Linux Kernel, and a working QEMU. You will step out of the classroom with the ability to follow the exact steps made in the tutorial to jump-start building your own Android system for any Virtual Machine - and with the tools and knowledge to build it for any custom device!

Tuesday April 29, 2014 5:20pm - 6:10pm
Blossom Hill I & II

5:20pm

Engaging Device Trees - Geert Uytterhoeven, Glider bvba
During the last few years, Device Trees (DT) became the preferred method in the Linux kernel to express the relationships between the various hardware components in a computer system in an OS-agnostic way. In an ideal world, all device drivers, and SoC and board support code use DT, with perfect and stable DT bindings. In reality, developers are confronted with a mix of new pure-DT, existing DT-aware, and legacy DT-hostile components.
Moreover, they want to backport new drivers and board support to one of the various long term stable trees like LTSI, which may not offer the same level of DT support as the fast moving mainline kernel. In this presentation, Geert will address challenges and offer best practices for a smooth transition from board files and platform devices via DT-aware systems to pure-DT systems, keeping in mind compatibility with long term stable trees.

Speakers
avatar for Geert Uytterhoeven

Geert Uytterhoeven

Owner, Glider bvba
Geert Uytterhoeven became involved with Linux more than 2 decades ago, when he started hacking the Linux kernel to make it work better on his Amiga. This paved the way for a long string of contributions to Linux. Geert may be most known as maintainer of Linux on the old m68k architecture, and as former maintainer of the Linux frame buffer device subsystem, but he has touched kernel code all over the place. In 2013, Geert founded Glider bvba... Read More →


Tuesday April 29, 2014 5:20pm - 6:10pm
Salon I/II

5:20pm

Fear and Loathing in the Media Transfer Protocol - Linus Walleij, Linaro
The Media Transfer Protocol (MTP) was invented as a transactional file system for media players, based on the Picture Transfer Protocol (PTP), an ISO standard used by cameras. It was a marginal project until all Android devices started shipping with an MTP stack. Now most everyone doing consumer devices deploy this protocol, so let us show you how this looks from the host side: what happens when a library (MTP responder) tries to talk to all these wildly diverging MTP implementations out there.

Speakers
LW

Linus Walleij

Kernel Developer, Linaro
Linus Walleij is a kernel developer at Linaro working on various embedded ARM systems, and a subsystem maintainer for the GPIO and pin control subsystems. Apart from the Linux kernel he works on libmtp and Fedora packages in his spare time.


Tuesday April 29, 2014 5:20pm - 6:10pm
Salon IV

5:20pm

Use-Case Power Management Optimization: Identifying & Tracking Key Power Indicators - Patrick Titiano, BayLibre
Embedded platforms performances keep increasing, quicker than power and thermal budgets, making Power Management (PM) an essential element. This presentation describes the importance of identifying and tracking KPI (Key Performance Indicators: C-States statistics / OPerating Points (OPP) Usage / Interrupts Rates / MPU Load / Memory Usage / Running Clocks / Power Status / ...) on a per use-case basis, to optimize power consumption at system-level (battery), but also to maintain temperature within limits. Following a short introduction to standard KPI, a methodology will be illustrated with practical examples extracted from critical use-cases (MP3 AV Playback, OS Idle, 3D Gaming) run on a real product. The need for dedicated and automated power management tooling (embedded power measurements, kernel instrumentation, user-space tooling) will be also highlighted.

Speakers
avatar for Patrick Titiano

Patrick Titiano

Embedded Power Management Engineer, BayLibre
Patrick Titiano has 15 years of engineering experience in embedded technologies. Patrick spent 9 years at Texas Instruments as a Power Management (PM) Expert. After 3 years as OMAP3 SW PM Architect (architecture, requirements, early prototyping), Patrick switched to a System PM Optimization role, tracking PM system issues of critical use-cases like Idle, MP3, Voice Call, Video Playback, 3D. Patrick also developed embedded diagnostic open source... Read More →


Tuesday April 29, 2014 5:20pm - 6:10pm
Salon III

6:15pm

6:30pm

(BoFs) Device Tree: Best Practices, Review Process & Maintainership Discussions
A review of how things are progressing with respect to device tree enabing of remaining pieces of the kernel. The review process was changed in October last year (at Kernel Summit) -- how has that been working out? Discussion among developers and maintainers of the various platforms affected by this.

Speakers
OJ

Olof Johansson

Olof Johansson first encounter with Linux was with SLS back in 1993. It was fairly brief, and he spent some dark years working on BSD and AIX after that. He finally found his way back to the light some ten years later -- first with PPC64 and later with ARM. Today he makes his living working on Chrome OS at Google. He has been co-maintainer of the arm-soc tree since 2011.


Tuesday April 29, 2014 6:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon I/II
 
Wednesday, April 30
 

8:00am

9:00am

Keynote Panel: IoT and the Role of Embedded Linux and Android - David Anders, CircuitCo; Tim Bird, Sony Mobile; Matt Porter, Linaro; Benjamin Zores, Alcatel-Lucent; Karim Yaghmour, OperSys (Moderator)
Abstract coming soon.

Moderators
avatar for Karim Yaghmou

Karim Yaghmou

CEO, Opersys inc.
Karim is part serial entrepreneur, part unrepentant geek. He's most widely know for his O'Reilly books: "Building Embedded Linux Systems" and "Embedded Android". As an active member of the open source community since the mid-90's, he pioneered the world of Linux tracing with the Linux Trace Toolkit and introduced Adeos, one of the first nanokernels/hypervisors for Linux. As part of his work, he's had the privilege of working with teams from a... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for David Anders

David Anders

Open Hardware Design Engineer, Intel
Software Engineer specializing in the integration of hardware and software at the lowest levels utilizing Open Source tools, bootloaders, and operating systems such as Linux to rapidly produce quality products. Past product developments have included the TCSX-1 thin client for Advantage Business Computer Systems, the M5900 handheld for American Microsystems Ltd., the PandaBoard for Texas Instruments, and the MinnowBoard Max for Intel.
avatar for Tim Bird

Tim Bird

Senior Software Engeineer, Sony Mobile
Tim Bird is a Senior Staff Software Engineer for Sony Corporation, where he helps Sony improve the Linux kernel for use in Sony's products. Tim is also the Chair of the Architecture Group of the CE Working Group of the Linux Foundation. Tim has been working with Linux for over 20 years and has spoken at numerous events, include almost all Embedded Linux Conferences, and many LinuxCon events.
avatar for Benjamin Zores

Benjamin Zores

Technical Director, Alcatel-Lucent Enterprise
As a software architect for Alcatel-Lucent, Ben has been designing embedded Linux devices for 10+ years, leading enterprise-grade Linux/Android multimedia IP phones conception. His area of expertise mostly covers low-level devices and platforms definition, board bring-up and drivers development, though his real passion comes from reverse-engineering the software architecture of operating systems as to understand what's beneath the hood. Prior... Read More →


Wednesday April 30, 2014 9:00am - 10:00am
San Jose Ballroom

10:00am

10:30am

Android Platform Debugging and Development - Karim Yaghmour, Opersys
While Android's use in embedded systems is now common, details about how to debug and develop in its internals are still hard to come by. Many very important questions therefore remain largely unanswered, such as: What's the best tools and techniques to follow a codepath from the app layer all the way down the kernel? How do I isolate a performance problem within the stack? What's the best way to edit and/or browse the Android sources? How can I set break points in Java code and still jump into the native C code that gets called from Java? This talk will explain the tools, techniques and, quite frankly, hacks that can be used to debug difficult problems within the Android stack. We'll cover both the tools and techniques that come from Linux and those that are Android specific. For example, we'll talk about Eclipse integration, Perf, ftrace, ddms, gdb, etc.

Speakers
avatar for Karim Yaghmou

Karim Yaghmou

CEO, Opersys inc.
Karim is part serial entrepreneur, part unrepentant geek. He's most widely know for his O'Reilly books: "Building Embedded Linux Systems" and "Embedded Android". As an active member of the open source community since the mid-90's, he pioneered the world of Linux tracing with the Linux Trace Toolkit and introduced Adeos, one of the first nanokernels/hypervisors for Linux. As part of his work, he's had the privilege of working with teams from a... Read More →


Wednesday April 30, 2014 10:30am - 11:20am
Willow Glen II/III

10:30am

BYOD Revisited: "Build" Your Own Device - Ron Munitz, Nubo
To develop a software product in the era of the Internet of Things, software developers are becoming integrators, juggling multiple open source repositories for high-level components for products ranging from fitness bracelets to LEGO.

Not only can we choose from a multitude of available (and inexpensive) components, we can sell the hardware on Kickstarter even before starting a prototype, replacing designated HW/SW assembly and libraries with a variety of powerful general-purpose operating systems that run on servers, desktops, smartphones, tablets, cars, and just about anything else.

In this session that will touch on topics covered during the IoT/Embedded Linux/Android Panel, Ron will present key milestones in the evolution of the Internet of Things, focusing on the present and immediate future, including techniques for rapidly prototyping and building product stacks (both hardware and software).

Speakers
avatar for Ron Munitz

Ron Munitz

CEO, PSCG
Ron is an entrepreneur and a software development consultant, with long history developing performance and safety critical software, leading development groups, and training application and platform developers. He specializes in all aspects of distributed systems and Android internals, and was the designer and original developer of the first Android Remote Display Protocol, and the first Remote Android Workspace for the Enterprise. He is also a... Read More →


Wednesday April 30, 2014 10:30am - 11:20am
Blossom Hill I & II

10:30am

(Tutorial) Some GCC Optimizations for Embedded Software - Khem Raj, Juniper Networks
GCC is an optimizing compiler, currently most common compiler to build software for Embedded Linux systems like Android, Yocto Project etc. This tutorial will introduce specific optimizations and features of GCC which are less known but could benefit optimizing software especially for embedded use while highlight the effect of common optimizations. While it will focus on squeezing most out of GCC, it will also cover some of pessimizations to avoid and will tip the developer to write code thats more conducive (compiler friendly) for general optimizations. They will also get some contrast with other compilers when needed

Speakers
avatar for Khem Raj

Khem Raj

Principle Linux Architect, Comcast RDK
Working on deploying Yocto Project/OpenEmbedded into Comcast's community Reference Design Kit for STB and broadband gateways as well as designing open source software development and contribution procedures. Previously worked at Juniper where he was responsible to creating and maintaining Linux base operating system for upcoming Junos( Juniper's Network Operating System) again it was based on Yocto project. He is a contributor and maintainer... Read More →


Wednesday April 30, 2014 10:30am - 11:20am
Salon III

10:30am

Linux for Microcontrollers: Spreading the Disease - Vitaly Wool, Softprise Consulting OU
With the growing interest in home automation, Linux-based smart sensor devices capable of talking to your mobile phones and tablets become hot topic. But with the obvious power constraints and cost-cutting pressure, deploying Linux on such devices turns out to be quite a challenge. This talk will present a success story of creating a Linux-running MCU-based DRAM-less home automation device, including criteria definition, comparison and selection of a suitable MCU, challenges met during development and debugging, and if time permits, a short demo.

Speakers
VW

Vitaly Wool

Sr. Developer, Softprise Consulting OU
Vitaly Wool, Senior Developer and just Linux enthusiast, graduated M.Sc. in Computer Science from St. Petersburg State Univ. in 2002, worked for starters with real-time OSes as VxWorks and RTEMS and mostly for PowerPC platforms. Vitaly moved to Moscow in 2003 where he started to work on embedded Linux projects for different platforms and architectures and for a variety of companies including MontaVista and Mentor Graphics.. Now he works as a... Read More →


Wednesday April 30, 2014 10:30am - 11:20am
Salon IV

10:30am

Trees need care: A Solution to Device Tree Validation Problem - Tomasz Figa, Samsun R&D Institute
Embedded and mobile devices are very important targets of Linux kernel development. To accommodate the growing number of systems supported and their diversity, Device Tree has been adopted by Linux kernel community as the method to describe all the hardware components of such systems. This proven solution has been working well for PowerPC systems for years, but it is not free from issues. Existing tools do not provide any means to validate device trees against defined Device Tree bindings, leaving any error detection to maintainers' eyes. In this presentation, Tomasz will explain the problem of missing device tree validation and introduce a validation solution that he has been working on in cooperation with rest of Linux kernel community.

Speakers
TF

Tomasz Figa

Samsun R&D Institute
Tomasz is a Linux enthusiast. Employed currently by Samsung R&D Institute Poland, he is responsible for low level SoC and board bring-up, but also handling of any showing up maintenance and Device Tree related tasks focused mostly, but not only, on support of Samsung platforms in Linux kernel. As of Linux 3.13 he is a maintainer of clock and pin control drivers for Samsung platforms. Tomasz has been working with Linux kernel since his high school... Read More →


Wednesday April 30, 2014 10:30am - 11:20am
Salon I/II

11:30am

Android KitKat Internals - Benjamin Zores, Alcatel-Lucent
Following's ABS 2012 and 2013 talks, this presentation provides a deep-dive into Android internal architecture with a specific enlightenment to major changes introduced by KitKat 4.4 release. The presentation targets Android platform developers, product designers and system integrators to better understand what's new beneath the hood and how to port your device to KitKat.

Speakers
avatar for Benjamin Zores

Benjamin Zores

Technical Director, Alcatel-Lucent Enterprise
As a software architect for Alcatel-Lucent, Ben has been designing embedded Linux devices for 10+ years, leading enterprise-grade Linux/Android multimedia IP phones conception. His area of expertise mostly covers low-level devices and platforms definition, board bring-up and drivers development, though his real passion comes from reverse-engineering the software architecture of operating systems as to understand what's beneath the hood. Prior... Read More →


Wednesday April 30, 2014 11:30am - 12:20pm
Willow Glen II/III

11:30am

Security Enhancements (SE) for Android - Stephen Smalley, US National Security Agency
Security Enhancements (SE) for Android(TM), formerly known as Security Enhanced Android, was first introduced two years ago at the 2012 Android Builders Summit. In 2013, SE for Android was adopted by Samsung as a core technology of their KNOX enterprise solution and shipped on the Galaxy S4 and Note 3 smartphones. The Android SELinux support contributed by the SE for Android project was also included in the mainline Android 4.3 and 4.4 releases from Google. In this talk, we describe the current state of the SE for Android project as a whole and the current state of SELinux support in mainline Android, explain how to use and apply SELinux in Android, and discuss further Android security enhancements beyond SELinux developed by the SE for Android project.

Speakers
SS

Stephen Smalley

Computer Security Researcher, National Security Agency
Stephen Smalley is a computer security researcher in the Trusted Systems Research organization of the US National Security Agency (NSA). He presently leads the NSA's Security Enhancements (SE) for Android project, which is advancing the state of the art in mobile operating system security. Prior to his work on Android, Mr. Smalley led the development and successful technology transfer of Security-Enhanced Linux (SELinux) to mainline Linux.


Wednesday April 30, 2014 11:30am - 12:20pm
Blossom Hill I & II

11:30am

(BoFs) QCOM SoC Mainlining - Moderated By Tim Bird, Sony Mobile
At this informal session, those interested in mainlining QualComm SOC support can discuss current patch and feature status and make plans for work and contributions for the next few kernel releases.

Speakers
avatar for Tim Bird

Tim Bird

Senior Software Engeineer, Sony Mobile
Tim Bird is a Senior Staff Software Engineer for Sony Corporation, where he helps Sony improve the Linux kernel for use in Sony's products. Tim is also the Chair of the Architecture Group of the CE Working Group of the Linux Foundation. Tim has been working with Linux for over 20 years and has spoken at numerous events, include almost all Embedded Linux Conferences, and many LinuxCon events.


Wednesday April 30, 2014 11:30am - 12:20pm
Salon IV

11:30am

(Tutorial) Some GCC Optimizations for Embedded Software (Cont.) - Khem Raj, Juniper Networks
GCC is an optimizing compiler, currently most common compiler to build software for Embedded Linux systems like Android, Yocto Project etc. This tutorial will introduce specific optimizations and features of GCC which are less known but could benefit optimizing software especially for embedded use while highlight the effect of common optimizations. While it will focus on squeezing most out of GCC, it will also cover some of pessimizations to avoid and will tip the developer to write code thats more conducive (compiler friendly) for general optimizations. They will also get some contrast with other compilers when needed

Speakers
avatar for Khem Raj

Khem Raj

Principle Linux Architect, Comcast RDK
Working on deploying Yocto Project/OpenEmbedded into Comcast's community Reference Design Kit for STB and broadband gateways as well as designing open source software development and contribution procedures. Previously worked at Juniper where he was responsible to creating and maintaining Linux base operating system for upcoming Junos( Juniper's Network Operating System) again it was based on Yocto project. He is a contributor and maintainer... Read More →


Wednesday April 30, 2014 11:30am - 12:20pm
Salon III

11:30am

Can A Board Bringing Up Be Less Painful, if with Yocto and Linux? - Insop Song, Gainspeed
Bring-up a brand new board requires a lot of efforts and time. In this presentation, Insop will share his very fresh experience of bringing up a new board with using Yocto and Linux kernel with many real world examples. Yocto project allows you to create a custom Linux-based embedded system. It provides many good examples and documents. However, for newcomers it could be a quite daunting task to figure out where to start and what to change and add in order to make their new systems. In the first part of the presentation, he will guide you through how to add/configure your own apps and new demons. In the second half of the presentation, he will share how to navigate through kernel and drivers and get what you want including flash drivers partitions, device tree, finding drivers for your devices.
He will conclude the presentation with his experience with Yocto and Linux communities.

Speakers

Wednesday April 30, 2014 11:30am - 12:20pm
Salon I/II

12:20pm

2:00pm

Android App Tuning Techniques Workshop - Mark Murphy, CommonsWare

While high-end Android devices have come a long way in the past few years, apps still run in constrained environments compared to desktop or server brethren. And Android is used for many low-end devices in emerging markets as well. In this half-day workshop, we will examine
how you can:

  • Reduce your app's memory use, to fit within Android's heap limit without hitting the dreaded OutOfMemoryError
  • How to determine where the "jank" is in your UI, due to too much CPU usage on the wrong threads, and how to fix it
  • Where to try to trim back your consumption of power, bandwidth, and other limited device resources

Attendees should have basic Android app development experience. Attendees will walk away with a set of action items of things to test, plus understanding of how to conduct the testing.


Speakers
avatar for Mark Murphy

Mark Murphy

Founder, CommonsWare, LLC
Mark Murphy is the founder of CommonsWare and the author of The Busy Coder’s Guide to Android Development. He is active in supporting the Android developer community, from answering questions on StackOverflow to publishing sample code and reusable components as open source.


Wednesday April 30, 2014 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Blossom Hill I & II

2:00pm

Making Android More Wearable: The Challenges of Adding Multi-Sports Sensors and Radios - Gil Zhaiek, Recon Instruments
While there are many amazing sensor libraries available in Android, adding support for sensors not in the default core of Android has many challenges. Gil Zhaiek will show the difficulties faced in adding support for radios outside of a typical Android environment. BLE and ANT+ support was added in-house to Jelly Bean - radios used by Heart Rate monitors, Bicycle Cadence & Pedometer sensors. Gil will also present work on how the 9-axis sensors were tested with the aid of a robot built in house. Gil will demonstrate solutions used to adapt Android to make it wearable: support required for micro screens (428x240), overcoming power consumption and heat consideration challenges, transferring AGPS data by Bluetooth to assist a GPS unit with a small antenna, batch support for sensors to overcome battery consumption issues prior to KitKat, and handling non touch inputs.

Speakers
avatar for Gil Zhaiek

Gil Zhaiek

Embedded Software Manager, Recon Instruments
Gil Zhaiek has worked in Recon Instruments, as Embedded Software Manager for the past 3 years focused on Heads Up Display and Wearable Technology, and has recently joined NewCircle (formerly Marakana), travelling the world teaching others about Android Internals. At Recon Instruments, Gil and his team have written firmware drivers for a wide array of sensors including GPS, WiFi, Bluetooth, Bluetooth Low Energy, Altimeter, 9-Axis Accelerometer and... Read More →


Wednesday April 30, 2014 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Willow Glen II/III

2:00pm

A Timeline For Embedded Linux - Chris Simmonds, 2net
Today, Linux is woven into the fabric of our technology, Things like printers, routers, TVs and phones all have their own "Inner Penguin". Yet it was never intended to be used beyond desktop and server PCs. A lot of things had to happen before Linux could break out of the PC environment and make its way in the world as a jobbing jack-of-all-trades. Since the early beginnings of embedded Linux in the late 1990's many people have contributed time and know-how that has resulted in today's Linux based embedded operating systems. This talk describes some of the key milestones and the events and people behind them.

Speakers
avatar for Chris Simmonds

Chris Simmonds

Consultant, 2net
Chris Simmonds is a freelance consultant and trainer who has been using Linux in embedded systems for over 15 years. He is the author of the book “Mastering Embedded Linux Programming”, and is a frequent presenter at open source and embedded conferences, including the Embedded Linux Conference and Embedded World. He has been running training courses in embedded Linux since 2002 and has delivered hundreds of sessions to many well-known... Read More →


Wednesday April 30, 2014 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Salon IV

2:00pm

An Introduction to the Video4Linux Framework - Hans Verkuil, Cisco Systems Norway
During the past five years a lot of work went into the video4linux subsystem of the kernel, in particular with respect to the frameworks that help the driver developers. Today all of the important pieces are in place, so this is a good time to give an overview of the kernel frameworks that help video4linux driver developers create good drivers. This presentation describes which frameworks are available, what the main structures are that you need to use and how they relate to one another.

Speakers
HV

Hans Verkuil

Senior R&D Software Engineer, Cisco Systems Norway
Hans Verkuil started contributing patches to the MPEG encoder/decoder ivtv driver in early 2004 and it snowballed from there. Since 2013 he is the video4linux co-maintainer responsible for V4L2 bridge drivers and video receivers and transmitters. He lives in Oslo, Norway, working as a senior R&D software engineer at Cisco Systems Norway, developing - surprise! - video4linux drivers.


Wednesday April 30, 2014 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Salon III

2:00pm

Two Years of ARM SoC Support mainlining: Lessons Learned - Thomas Petazzoni, Free Electrons
Throughout the last two years, a team of engineers at Free Electrons has been involved in mainlining the support for several ARM processors from Marvell, converting the not-so-great vendor-specific BSP into mainline quality code progressively merged upstream. This effort of several hundreds working days, has led to the integration of hundreds of patches in the kernel. Through this talk we would like to share some lessons learned regarding this mainlining effort, which could be useful to other engineers involved in ARM SoC support, as well as detail the steps we have gone through, the mistakes we've made and how we solved them, and generally our experience on this project.

Speakers
avatar for Thomas Petazzoni

Thomas Petazzoni

CTO and Embedded Linux Engineer, Free Electrons
Thomas Petazzoni is CTO and embedded Linux engineer at Free Electrons. He contributes to the support of Marvell ARM processors in the Linux kernel, and is a major contributor to the Buildroot embedded Linux build system. As part of his Buildroot work, Thomas has done extensive contributions to the code building cross-compilation toolchains and the code importing existing cross-compilation toolchains in Buildroot.


Wednesday April 30, 2014 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Salon I/II

3:00pm

Android App Tuning Techniques Workshop (Cont.) - Mark Murphy, CommonsWare

While high-end Android devices have come a long way in the past few years, apps still run in constrained environments compared to desktop or server brethren. And Android is used for many low-end devices in emerging markets as well. In this half-day workshop, we will examine
how you can:

  • Reduce your app's memory use, to fit within Android's heap limit without hitting the dreaded OutOfMemoryError
  • How to determine where the "jank" is in your UI, due to too much CPU usage on the wrong threads, and how to fix it
  • Where to try to trim back your consumption of power, bandwidth, and other limited device resources

Attendees should have basic Android app development experience. Attendees will walk away with a set of action items of things to test, plus understanding of how to conduct the testing.


Speakers
avatar for Mark Murphy

Mark Murphy

Founder, CommonsWare, LLC
Mark Murphy is the founder of CommonsWare and the author of The Busy Coder’s Guide to Android Development. He is active in supporting the Android developer community, from answering questions on StackOverflow to publishing sample code and reusable components as open source.


Wednesday April 30, 2014 3:00pm - 3:50pm
Blossom Hill I & II

3:00pm

Debugging - Linux Kernel Testing - Matt Porter, Linaro
This BoFs is intended to bring together anybody that tests the Linux kernel to share best practices and brainstorm new ideas. Topics may range from .config testing, module/built-in drivers, test methods and tools for testing specific driver subsystems, VM/scheduler/interrupt stress testing, and beyond. The discussion is targeted at Linux kernel developers, test engineers, and embedded Linux product teams/consultants with the common task of testing Linux kernel integrity. Attendees should have a firm grasp of building and deploying the kernel as well as kernel/userspace kernel APIs.

Wednesday April 30, 2014 3:00pm - 3:50pm
Salon III

3:00pm

Hardware-Assisted Software Tracing - Adrien Vergé, École Polytechnique Montréal
Tracing is a reliable and low-intrusiveness method to debug and optimize systems and processes. Low overhead is particularly important in embedded systems where resources and energy consumption is critical. The most advanced tracing infrastructures achieve a very low footprint on the traced software, bringing each tracepoint overhead to less than a microsecond. To reduce this still non negligible impact, the use of dedicated hardware resources is promising.In this presentation, Adrien Vergé will present alternate methods for tracing, that rely on ARM CoreSight and Intel BTS hardware modules. He will show that the time overhead for tracing can be reduced by up to four times when assisted by hardware, as compared to software tracing with LTTng, a performance oriented tracer for Linux.The proposed solutions take advantage of hardware modules present on most newer ARM SoC and Intel CPUs.

Speakers
avatar for Adrien Vergé

Adrien Vergé

Adrien Vergé is an engineer who graduated from the École Polytechnique (France) in 2012. He does research on tracing optimization on ARM systems at École Polytechnique Montréal (Canada), in collaboration with Ericsson and EfficiOS, in the lab where the Linux Trace Toolkit (LTTng) was created. He has a patent pending for optimizing the Tor privacy-preserving network, based on a work with Technicolor in 2012. He has published on ARM code... Read More →


Wednesday April 30, 2014 3:00pm - 3:50pm
Salon IV

3:00pm

LLVMLinux: Embracing the Dragon - Behan Webster, Converse in Code Inc.
This session will provide an update on the status of the LLVMLinux project; a project which is cooperating with both the Linux kernel and LLVM communities to build the Linux kernel with Clang/LLVM. This talk will also cover new things in LLVM which make clang even more attractive to the kernel community. LLVM is an extensive compiler technology suite which is already commonplace from Android/Renderscript and OpenCL through to high performance computing clusters.

Speakers
avatar for Behan Webster

Behan Webster

Chief Engineer, Converse in Code Inc
Behan Webster has spent two decades in diverse tech industries such as telecom, datacom, optical, and automotive writing code for a range of hardware from the very small to the very large. He has Linux experience spans kernel programming, Embedded Linux, and board bring-up. Currently Behan is the lead consultant at Converse in Code Inc, an embedded Linux engineer and project lead working on the LLVMLinux project as well as being a Trainer for The... Read More →


Wednesday April 30, 2014 3:00pm - 3:50pm
Salon I/II

3:50pm

4:20pm

Android App Tuning Techniques Workshop (Cont.) - Mark Murphy, CommonsWare

While high-end Android devices have come a long way in the past few years, apps still run in constrained environments compared to desktop or server brethren. And Android is used for many low-end devices in emerging markets as well. In this half-day workshop, we will examine
how you can:

  • Reduce your app's memory use, to fit within Android's heap limit without hitting the dreaded OutOfMemoryError
  • How to determine where the "jank" is in your UI, due to too much CPU usage on the wrong threads, and how to fix it
  • Where to try to trim back your consumption of power, bandwidth, and other limited device resources

Attendees should have basic Android app development experience. Attendees will walk away with a set of action items of things to test, plus understanding of how to conduct the testing.


Speakers
avatar for Mark Murphy

Mark Murphy

Founder, CommonsWare, LLC
Mark Murphy is the founder of CommonsWare and the author of The Busy Coder’s Guide to Android Development. He is active in supporting the Android developer community, from answering questions on StackOverflow to publishing sample code and reusable components as open source.


Wednesday April 30, 2014 4:20pm - 5:10pm
Blossom Hill I & II

4:20pm

Android on Atom for Teeth Health - Rafael Coutinho, PhiInnovations
One of our customers was having lots of trouble with his Atom processor hardwares running Ubuntu with a very limited application for dentists. The main focus of the application was controlling a camera to get pictures for teeth diseases. We suggested to port Android to his device and develop a new home for it and application. He agreed with the challenge. So we ported Android x86 to this hardware having as main challenges the video capture card porting and multiple USB (not supported on that time). Today the innovative result of our work made him the first choice of brazilian dentists to have a clinic system.

Speakers
avatar for Rafael Coutinho

Rafael Coutinho

Software Architect, PhiInnovations
Software Architect. Broad experience in several technologies, from distributed enterprise systems development, to mobile development and GIS. Currently I'm having the most challenging entrepreneurship experience i have ever had. I have associated to THE embedded system company and been in charge of creating systems from a raw hardware, building its kernel, operating system and high level software. Previous speaking experiences on ESRI User... Read More →


Wednesday April 30, 2014 4:20pm - 5:10pm
Willow Glen II/III

4:20pm

(BoFs) ARM/ARM64: Code Sharing, Consolidation & Upstreaming - Moderated by Olof Johansson, Google
Several vendors are getting ready to start enabling the upstream kernel for their upcoming 64-bit ARM platforms, and it opens up a few questions on things that are not quite sorted out yet, especially on the embedded and mobile platforms. This is an open discussion on the issues these maintainers are anticipating, and what we should do about it.

Speakers
OJ

Olof Johansson

Olof Johansson first encounter with Linux was with SLS back in 1993. It was fairly brief, and he spent some dark years working on BSD and AIX after that. He finally found his way back to the light some ten years later -- first with PPC64 and later with ARM. Today he makes his living working on Chrome OS at Google. He has been co-maintainer of the arm-soc tree since 2011.


Wednesday April 30, 2014 4:20pm - 5:10pm
Salon IV

4:20pm

Debugging - Matt Ranostay, Intel Open Source Technology Center & David Anders, CircuitCo
Sigrok: Using Logic to Debug Logic (Matt Ranostay)
This talk will highlight the shortfalls of current debugging software for Linux using various cheap to expensive devices which some are completely Open Hardware. Sigrok project will be demoed in full along with some comparable OSS debugger based projects. Various things can be done within a Linux environment to progress low-level Linux development using logic analyzers + DSO + JTAG. Various features will be discussed including but not limited to simple + complex triggers, DDR mode hacks, and protocol decoding.

Hardware Debugging Tools (David Anders)
Ubiquitous, powerful, and low-cost microcontrollers have enabled a new breed of capable yet affordable logic analyzers and oscilloscopes. Not only are these types of tools now cost effective, but their creation provides great examples of how the open source model has the ability to positively impact a wide range of fields outside of the realm of software development.

Speakers
avatar for David Anders

David Anders

Open Hardware Design Engineer, Intel
Software Engineer specializing in the integration of hardware and software at the lowest levels utilizing Open Source tools, bootloaders, and operating systems such as Linux to rapidly produce quality products. Past product developments have included the TCSX-1 thin client for Advantage Business Computer Systems, the M5900 handheld for American Microsystems Ltd., the PandaBoard for Texas Instruments, and the MinnowBoard Max for Intel.
avatar for Matt Ranostay

Matt Ranostay

Senior Software Engineer, Ranostay Consulting, LLC
Matt has worked in the Embedded Linux field in various roles for 10+ years at various companies including Embedded Alley, Mentor Graphics, and Intel's Open Source Technology Center.


Wednesday April 30, 2014 4:20pm - 5:10pm
Salon III

4:20pm

Introducing Embedded Linux to Universities - Victor Rodriguez, Intel
The Linux kernel is the core of many embedded system. However many universities word wide face the problem of adapt their embedded curricula into the Linux kernel world. Victor will present a strategy based on his experience to make this adaptation easier, productive and adaptable to multiple universities and embedded platform manufacturers.

Speakers
avatar for Victor Rodriguez

Victor Rodriguez

LInux SW engineer, Intel
Victor was maintainer and developer of the board OMAP138 “Hawk board” on the Linux project. At Intel he is part of the Open Source Technology Center as OS developer. He is in charge of the Power and Performance team of the Clear Linux* Project for Intel® Architecture OS . He also has experience as SW validation and tools development engineer in HPC and binary translation teams. In his free time is volunteer with Intel Education and regularly... Read More →


Wednesday April 30, 2014 4:20pm - 5:10pm
Salon I/II

5:20pm

Android App Tuning Techniques Workshop (Cont.) - Mark Murphy, CommonsWare

While high-end Android devices have come a long way in the past few years, apps still run in constrained environments compared to desktop or server brethren. And Android is used for many low-end devices in emerging markets as well. In this half-day workshop, we will examine
how you can:

  • Reduce your app's memory use, to fit within Android's heap limit without hitting the dreaded OutOfMemoryError
  • How to determine where the "jank" is in your UI, due to too much CPU usage on the wrong threads, and how to fix it
  • Where to try to trim back your consumption of power, bandwidth, and other limited device resources

Attendees should have basic Android app development experience. Attendees will walk away with a set of action items of things to test, plus understanding of how to conduct the testing.


Speakers
avatar for Mark Murphy

Mark Murphy

Founder, CommonsWare, LLC
Mark Murphy is the founder of CommonsWare and the author of The Busy Coder’s Guide to Android Development. He is active in supporting the Android developer community, from answering questions on StackOverflow to publishing sample code and reusable components as open source.


Wednesday April 30, 2014 5:20pm - 6:10pm
Blossom Hill I & II

5:20pm

Bringing the BlueZ bBck to Android - Marcel Holtmann, Intel's Open Source Technology Center
With the introduction of Bluetooth Smart aka Low Energy the ubiquity of Bluetooth is more and more present. The technology is used everywhere. It is in phones, tablets, cars, televisions, 3D glasses, sensors, wearables, medical devices, home automation and many more. Bluetooth 4.1 specification was released in December 2013. It enables stronger authentication and encryption, reduces power consumption and is preparing Bluetooth for the world of Internet of Things. This presentation will give an overview on how we integrated BlueZ into Android as a drop-in replacement for the default Bluedroid stack. It will show how Bluetooth 4.1 features are already integrated today and ready to be deployed. The presentation will show the benefits of using BlueZ on Android. It will also give a clear outlook on what will be possible with BlueZ for Android in the near future.

Wednesday April 30, 2014 5:20pm - 6:10pm
Willow Glen II/III

5:20pm

Building Tools From the Outside In: Bringing User-Centered Design to Embedded Linux - Belen Barros Pena, Intel's Open Source Technology Center
Developers tend to think of software in the same way we hang our jeans to dry: inside out. And with good reason: they face the enormous challenge of building software that works. In order to succeed, they must focus on the technology, and not so much on what happens at the periphery of it.
Interaction designers deal with a different challenge: they must build software that makes sense to the people who use it. In order to succeed, they must think of software from the outside in, starting from its users, what they want and what they need. This talk is the story of how the Yocto Project built Toaster, its latest application, from the outside in, focusing on its users, what they want and what they need. It will show how user-centered design techniques can be adapted to the particularities of the embedded Linux community, and how they can be applied to help improve embedded Linux tools.

Speakers
avatar for Belen Barros Pena

Belen Barros Pena

Interaction designer, Intel's Open Source Technology Center
I have been an interaction designer since 2007 and joined the Open Source Technology Center at Intel in 2011. In January 2013 I became "the designer" of the Yocto Project (I am the only one), where I help develop graphical user interfaces for the project's embedded Linux tools. I am partly to blame for things like Hob (https://www.yoctoproject.org/documentation/hob-manual), Toaster (https://www.yoctoproject.org/toaster/) and the OpenEmbedded... Read More →


Wednesday April 30, 2014 5:20pm - 6:10pm
Salon IV

5:20pm

Debugging - Panel Discussion - Karim Yaghmour, OperSys; Matt Ranostay, Intel; David Anders, CircuitCo; Matt Porter, Linaro
A panel discussion on current issues with debugging kernel with device tree, board bring up, and open tools.

Speakers
avatar for David Anders

David Anders

Open Hardware Design Engineer, Intel
Software Engineer specializing in the integration of hardware and software at the lowest levels utilizing Open Source tools, bootloaders, and operating systems such as Linux to rapidly produce quality products. Past product developments have included the TCSX-1 thin client for Advantage Business Computer Systems, the M5900 handheld for American Microsystems Ltd., the PandaBoard for Texas Instruments, and the MinnowBoard Max for Intel.
avatar for Matt Ranostay

Matt Ranostay

Senior Software Engineer, Ranostay Consulting, LLC
Matt has worked in the Embedded Linux field in various roles for 10+ years at various companies including Embedded Alley, Mentor Graphics, and Intel's Open Source Technology Center.
avatar for Karim Yaghmou

Karim Yaghmou

CEO, Opersys inc.
Karim is part serial entrepreneur, part unrepentant geek. He's most widely know for his O'Reilly books: "Building Embedded Linux Systems" and "Embedded Android". As an active member of the open source community since the mid-90's, he pioneered the world of Linux tracing with the Linux Trace Toolkit and introduced Adeos, one of the first nanokernels/hypervisors for Linux. As part of his work, he's had the privilege of working with teams from a... Read More →


Wednesday April 30, 2014 5:20pm - 6:10pm
Salon III

5:20pm

System Power Management Interface (SPMI) - Josh Cartwright, Qualcomm Innovation Center
Communication between components is necessary for effective power management in mobile devices. The System Power Management Interface, also known as SPMI, is a standardized bus interface intended to provide power-management related connectivity between components. Josh Cartwright will provide a high-level architectural overview of SPMI and discuss how to leverage the Linux Kernel software interfaces (expected to land in 3.15) to communicate with devices on the bus.

Speakers
JC

Josh Cartwright

Software Engineer, Qualcomm Innovation Center
Josh Cartwright has been a Linux enthusiast since he first installed Slackware on an old machine ten years ago. He's currently a Software Engineer at the Qualcomm Innovation Center out of Austin, TX, where he's part of a team tasked with rounding out upstream Linux Kernel support for the MSM family of SoCs. When he's not hacking on Linux, he likes to homebrew beer.


Wednesday April 30, 2014 5:20pm - 6:10pm
Salon I/II

6:30pm

 
Thursday, May 1
 

8:00am

9:00am

Embedded Android Workshop - Karim Yaghmour
While Android has been created for mobile devices -- phones first and now tablets -- it can, nonetheless, be used as the basis of any touch-screen system, whether it be mobile or not. Essentially, Android is a custom-built embedded Linux distribution with a very elaborate and rich set of user-space abstractions, APIs, services and virtual machine. This one-day workshop is aimed at embedded developers wanting to build embedded systems using Android. It will cover Android from the ground up, enabling developers to get a firm hold on the components that make up Android and how they need to be adapted to an embedded system. Specifically, we will start by introducing Android's overall architecture and then proceed to peel Android's layer one-by-one.

This 1/2 workshop is aimed at embedded developers that want to use Android in their embedded designs.


While Android interest is soaring, there is little incentive for its originator (Google) to document its internals or how developers can find their way around. This talk is one I've been giving regularly at many conferences and that is typically strongly attended and liked. It was also the basis of my O'Reilly book on the same topic.


Speakers
avatar for Karim Yaghmou

Karim Yaghmou

CEO, Opersys inc.
Karim is part serial entrepreneur, part unrepentant geek. He's most widely know for his O'Reilly books: "Building Embedded Linux Systems" and "Embedded Android". As an active member of the open source community since the mid-90's, he pioneered the world of Linux tracing with the Linux Trace Toolkit and introduced Adeos, one of the first nanokernels/hypervisors for Linux. As part of his work, he's had the privilege of working with teams from a... Read More →


Thursday May 1, 2014 9:00am - 9:50am
Willow Glen II/III

9:00am

The Growth of Android in Embedded Systems - Benjamin Zores, Alcatel-Lucent
Linux has continuously grown in the embedded systems market for over a decade, gaining market share from proprietary operating systems. The proliferation of embedded devices, the explosion of open source development, the inherent hardware support, the incredible networking capabilities and the royalty-free economic model have all helped propel use of the Linux kernel into one of the best choices for the design of new embedded systems.

While the success of Linux in the embedded market cannot be denied, its notoriety was once confined to mostly technical professionals. That changed in 2008 with Google’s release of the Android mobile phone operating system, based on the Linux kernel. Thus began the tremendous growth of Linux in the consumer world, with over one million Android devices being activated every day and more than 1 billion devices shipped in 2013.

One year after the warmly welcomed Linux Foundation's white-paper and webinar, "The Growth of Android in Embedded Systems" comes back as a keynote, targeting any IT professional willing to consider selecting Android or sticking to a regular Linux distribution for its next-generation embedded system design.

One year after the warmly welcomed Linux Foundation's white-paper and webinar, "The Growth of Android in Embedded Systems" comes back as a keynote, targeting any IT professional willing to consider selecting Android or sticking to a regular Linux distribution for its next-generation embedded system design.  

Speakers
avatar for Benjamin Zores

Benjamin Zores

Technical Director, Alcatel-Lucent Enterprise
As a software architect for Alcatel-Lucent, Ben has been designing embedded Linux devices for 10+ years, leading enterprise-grade Linux/Android multimedia IP phones conception. His area of expertise mostly covers low-level devices and platforms definition, board bring-up and drivers development, though his real passion comes from reverse-engineering the software architecture of operating systems as to understand what's beneath the hood. Prior... Read More →


Thursday May 1, 2014 9:00am - 9:50am
Blossom Hill I & II

9:00am

Extending Linux using Arduinos - Michael E Anderson, The PTR Group, Inc.
Linux-based devices such as the Beaglebone and Raspberry Pi are powerful, yet affordable platforms that are capable of interfacing to a number of devices. And yet, in spite of their inherent I/O capacity, the Maker movement and many other rapid-prototyping and experimenter communities find them lacking. The need for pin muxes and a lack of standardized GPIO, I2C and PWM interfaces make these Linux platforms less than ideal for a wide variety of real-world applications. However, the ecosystem surrounding the Arduino open-source hardware provides for a variety of interfaces, all with an intuitive software model that makes complex interfaces simple to implement. This presentation will outline the reasons for the success of the Arduino ecosystem and why Linux-based platforms could benefit from leveraging the Arduino platform to make embedded Linux more approachable.

Speakers
avatar for Michael E Anderson

Michael E Anderson

Chief Scientist, The PTR Group, inc.
Mike Anderson is currently CTO and Chief Scientist for The PTR Group, Inc. With over 39 years in the embedded and real-time computing industry, Mike works with a number of RTOS, Linux and Android-based devices in applications ranging from satellites and robotics to SCADA platforms. However, his focus over the past few years has been the use of Linux and Android in embedded sensor applications and the deployment of the Internet of Things.


Thursday May 1, 2014 9:00am - 9:50am
Salon IV

9:00am

Understanding the Embedded Linux Ecosystem with Codeface - Wolfgang Mauerer, Siemens
Embedded Linux goes much beyond just the Linux kernel. While the kernel is very well understood for its technical benefits, development approach and social aspects, most other components of the embedded stack are less thoroughly analysed. Codeface (siemens.github.io/codeface) is a web frontend and framework to mine and analyse data sources - version control systems, mailing lists, bug trackers and raw source code. Using advanced statistical and machine learning techniques, we can understand collaboration structures in communities, evaluate the technical qualities of projects, classify different approaches to development and maintenance, and learn about the history of projects in much more detail than in typical analyses, including the popular ones of the Linux kernel. A particular focus is on the social aspects of projects, which Codeface helps to understand quantitatively.

Speakers
WM

Wolfgang Mauerer

Professor/Senior Software Architect, Technical University Regensburg/Siemens AG
Wolfgang Mauerer is a senior key expert at Siemens Corporate Research, Corporate Competence Centre Embedded Linux, where he deals with establishing Linux in innovative and demanding industrial areas. He also serves as professor of theoretical computer science at the Technical University Regensburg, and is a member of the technical board of the Linux Foundation's newly founded civil infrastructure platform. His academic research deals with finding... Read More →


Thursday May 1, 2014 9:00am - 9:50am
Salon III

9:00am

Volatile Ranges - Minchan Kim, LG Electronics
Volatile Ranges(Minchan Kim, LG) - Volatile ranges is a new feature for linux kernel. Normally, programs have cache on heap to perform well. It could be good thing if system memory is enough but what if system memory start to be tight? Yes, swapping, which is what everybody doesn't want. Even, many embedded devices don't have swap so they could see OOM, unfortunately. Hope volatile ranges makes userspace folks to handle cache management easy so that they overcome the problem, at last.

Speakers
MK

Minchan Kim

Kernel Engineer, LG
Minchan is kernel engineer at LG electronics and has involved with community for a long time. Currently, he is maintainer of zRAM and zsmalloc and is tackling with other mm feature to help small memory system. | He will talk about background and concept of GCMA.


Thursday May 1, 2014 9:00am - 9:50am
Salon I/II

10:00am

Embedded Android Workshop (Cont.) - Karim Yaghmour
While Android has been created for mobile devices -- phones first and now tablets -- it can, nonetheless, be used as the basis of any touch-screen system, whether it be mobile or not. Essentially, Android is a custom-built embedded Linux distribution with a very elaborate and rich set of user-space abstractions, APIs, services and virtual machine. This one-day workshop is aimed at embedded developers wanting to build embedded systems using Android. It will cover Android from the ground up, enabling developers to get a firm hold on the components that make up Android and how they need to be adapted to an embedded system. Specifically, we will start by introducing Android's overall architecture and then proceed to peel Android's layer one-by-one.

This 1/2 workshop is aimed at embedded developers that want to use Android in their embedded designs.


While Android interest is soaring, there is little incentive for its originator (Google) to document its internals or how developers can find their way around. This talk is one I've been giving regularly at many conferences and that is typically strongly attended and liked. It was also the basis of my O'Reilly book on the same topic.


Speakers
avatar for Karim Yaghmou

Karim Yaghmou

CEO, Opersys inc.
Karim is part serial entrepreneur, part unrepentant geek. He's most widely know for his O'Reilly books: "Building Embedded Linux Systems" and "Embedded Android". As an active member of the open source community since the mid-90's, he pioneered the world of Linux tracing with the Linux Trace Toolkit and introduced Adeos, one of the first nanokernels/hypervisors for Linux. As part of his work, he's had the privilege of working with teams from a... Read More →


Thursday May 1, 2014 10:00am - 10:50am
Willow Glen II/III

10:00am

Rom Cooking and Good Practices - Jeremy Vagnet, Genymobile
This talk will be about rom cooking in professional environment. Charles-­Henry will explain how to manage sources, how to integrate a device in the build system the correct way, and how to add a feature in android from low level to application through the HAL and the frameworks. He will also point out the common mistakes and how to avoid them. Among other things, he will present the differences between android/linux and gnu/linux.

Thursday May 1, 2014 10:00am - 10:50am
Blossom Hill I & II

10:00am

Linux Quickboot - Tristan Lelong, Adeneo Embedded
This presentation will show how to achieve a quick boot of Linux running on an embedded system. We will describe the different components that can be leveraged from the open source community and how should they be modified to achieve the best performances. The optimization process will also be explained along with various figures regarding the different steps of the boot process. Finally, we will talk about the trade-off when doing quick boot and how to find some workarounds to minimize the boot duration while keeping a full featured Linux system.

Thursday May 1, 2014 10:00am - 10:50am
Salon III

10:00am

Open-Source Tools for Software-Defined Radio on Multicore ARM+DSP - Philip Balister, OpenSDR
The presentation shows how Texas Instrument’s Keystone2 multicore ARM+DSP system on chip (SoC) works with the open source software radio package GNU Radio. GNU Radio is a popular package for developing software radio applications. Traditionally, GNU Radio has a General Purpose Processor (GPP) centric focus, however there is increasing interest accelerators signal processing operations with coprocessors. The Keystone 2 has general purpose DSP processors and some application specific coprocessors. Integrating co-processors with software running on the GPP must be careful to use low-overhead data passing schemes to avoid wasteful copies that can offset the gains due to the accelerator. This presentation will show how these co-processor can be integrated with GNU Radio. It will also cover some of the tool and work flow issues developing software for the DSP.

Speakers
avatar for Philip Balister

Philip Balister

Minister of Progress, OpenSDR
Philip Balister works on Embedded Systems with a software defined radio focus. His consulting business is OpenSDR. He is a member of the OpenEmbedded project and works closely with the Yocto Project. He has spoke at Embedded Linux and academic conferences many times.


Thursday May 1, 2014 10:00am - 10:50am
Salon IV

10:00am

Using Agile Development Practices For Kernel Development - Chase Maupin, Texas Instruments
This presentation will discuss issues in implementing Scrum for Linux Kernel development, including striking a balance between upstream community support and kernel productization, tracking merge windows and handling upstream feedback while meeting key customer deliverables, and effectively utilizing top talent from around the world. With a charter to both provide productized kernels to the various development teams within TI as well as to work with the Linux community to gain support for TI devices upstream, the speaker can share lessons learned in striking the proper balance between these two goals. He will share key learnings from working with the LCPD team in implementing a Scrum development model that has resulted in both increased support for TI devices upstream as well as more complete and robust productized kernels created from mainline stable releases.

Speakers
CM

Chase Maupin

System Integration Manager, Texas Instruments
Chase Maupin is the system integration manager for the Linux Core Product Development (LCPD) team at Texas Instruments (TI). Chase is also a certified Scrum master and certified Scrum product owner from the Scrum Alliance. He has been actively working with the LCPD team regarding using Agile development practices to coordinate their upstream development efforts as well as customer support. The System Integration team is responsible assembling the... Read More →


Thursday May 1, 2014 10:00am - 10:50am
Salon I/II

10:50am

11:20am

Embedded Android Workshop (Cont.) - Karim Yaghmour
While Android has been created for mobile devices -- phones first and now tablets -- it can, nonetheless, be used as the basis of any touch-screen system, whether it be mobile or not. Essentially, Android is a custom-built embedded Linux distribution with a very elaborate and rich set of user-space abstractions, APIs, services and virtual machine. This one-day workshop is aimed at embedded developers wanting to build embedded systems using Android. It will cover Android from the ground up, enabling developers to get a firm hold on the components that make up Android and how they need to be adapted to an embedded system. Specifically, we will start by introducing Android's overall architecture and then proceed to peel Android's layer one-by-one.

This 1/2 workshop is aimed at embedded developers that want to use Android in their embedded designs.


While Android interest is soaring, there is little incentive for its originator (Google) to document its internals or how developers can find their way around. This talk is one I've been giving regularly at many conferences and that is typically strongly attended and liked. It was also the basis of my O'Reilly book on the same topic.


Speakers
avatar for Karim Yaghmou

Karim Yaghmou

CEO, Opersys inc.
Karim is part serial entrepreneur, part unrepentant geek. He's most widely know for his O'Reilly books: "Building Embedded Linux Systems" and "Embedded Android". As an active member of the open source community since the mid-90's, he pioneered the world of Linux tracing with the Linux Trace Toolkit and introduced Adeos, one of the first nanokernels/hypervisors for Linux. As part of his work, he's had the privilege of working with teams from a... Read More →


Thursday May 1, 2014 11:20am - 12:10pm
Willow Glen II/III

11:20am

Here be Dragons: Using clang/LLVM to Build Android - Behan Webster, Converse in Code
This session will talk about the benefits of using clang and LLVM for Android OS development. LLVM is already being used in Android for such things as Renderscript, llvmpipe, OpenCL and the kernel (LLVMLinux).  This talk will also cover new things in LLVM which make clang even more attractive to the Android community.  LLVM is an extensive compiler technology suite which is used in areas such as Embedded and Mobile up through to high performance computing clusters. LLVM also provides a set of libraries that can be used to create new analysis and optimization tools.

This session presents an alternative toolchain and related technologies with which to build the Linux kernel, as well as other parts of the Linux ecosystem. LLVM and clang are an attractive toolchain for individuals, projects, researchers, and companies who want an alternative to the more traditional tools. People are attracted to LLVM for the developer community, newer compiler architecture and approach, and in some cases code license. At the very least the hope is to provide competition in the tool arena such that all developers win.

This talk is for developers and system integrators who are interested in LLVM technologies and using clang to build Android. 

Speakers
avatar for Behan Webster

Behan Webster

Chief Engineer, Converse in Code Inc
Behan Webster has spent two decades in diverse tech industries such as telecom, datacom, optical, and automotive writing code for a range of hardware from the very small to the very large. He has Linux experience spans kernel programming, Embedded Linux, and board bring-up. Currently Behan is the lead consultant at Converse in Code Inc, an embedded Linux engineer and project lead working on the LLVMLinux project as well as being a Trainer for The... Read More →


Thursday May 1, 2014 11:20am - 12:10pm
Blossom Hill I & II

11:20am

Hardware Accelerated Video Streaming with V4L2 - Gabriel Huau, Adeneo Embedded
One of the main API to display video with Linux is V4L2. A lot of embedded projects need to capture and display live stream from video sensors (USB, CSI, etc.). Often the requirement is high frame-rate performances. This presentation will cover the development of a full V4L2 application and how to use specific GPU features to optimize the renderer. A demonstration will show advantages and drawbacks.

Speakers

Thursday May 1, 2014 11:20am - 12:10pm
Salon IV

11:20am

SMP Bring Up On ARM SOCs - Gregory Clement
All the new ARM CPUs are now SMP capable and most of the new ARM SoCs actually use multiple CPUs. Adding SMP support for an SoC means adding specific code very early during the boot process, but also using new APIs, filling the mandatory SMP operations and dealing with new kind of issues. This talk will cover all the aspects: we will see the mandatory parts to add and some parts that are nice to have. Then we will show how to implement them. And finally we will share our experience on the various issues we encountered through real examples.

Speakers
avatar for Gregory Clement

Gregory Clement

Embedded Linux Software Engineer, Free Electrons
Gregory Clement is an embedded Linux engineer and trainer at Free Electrons since 2010. He has 15 years of on the field experience in porting and operating embedded Linux on many hardware architectures. He is currently involved in the integration of Marvell Armada 370/375/38x/39x/XP and the new ARM64 37xx/7K/8K SoC support in the mainline Linux kernel, acting as co-maintainer for the mvebu ARM sub-architecture (which includes the orion5x... Read More →


Thursday May 1, 2014 11:20am - 12:10pm
Salon III

11:20am

The #qt/#wayland/#systemd/#btrfs-phone ... the Jolla phone - David Greaves, Mer Project
Jolla recently brought a smartphone to market - this is the OSS story behind that device. For the technologist in us: it matters because this is a smartphone that runs Qt5, libhybris, wayland, systemd, btrfs, git, connman, dbus, rpm and of course, a linux kernel. On top of an Android BSP. That list means a LOT to anyone involved in the larger Linux landscape today. For our passion for open source & libre software: it's a smartphone built on our open source projects; run in the open; by people from the community. For the businessman: an international team of 80 people took less than a year to deliver. The Mer project vision is "Make it easy to make devices". The "Jolla" shows how that can be done - and libhybris is key to running on affordable hardware. There are more facets too : the "distro" approach, systems, processes, best practices and docs; essentially why "Code is not enough".

Speakers
DG

David Greaves

Co-Founder, Mer Project
David Greaves is one of the co-founders of the Mer Project (http://www.merproject.org/) where he now focuses on systems and vendor relations. He currently works with Jolla on 'futures' which is how he knows Mer can enable vendors to deliver world-class technology. | | After many years working all around BT in both technical and commercial roles, David came to MeeGo - on the corporate side he was the Build Systems Architect for Nokia's MeeGo... Read More →


Thursday May 1, 2014 11:20am - 12:10pm
Salon I/II

12:10pm

2:00pm

Linux Media - Sharing Media Functions Nicely Across Drivers - Shuah Khan, Samsung
Media devices can be very complex to support in software - for example, a small USB TV stick is packed with several components providing the functionality to tune, stream analog and/or digital video and audio. Some hybrid devices support both analog, and digital TV tuning
capability with or without a remote control capability. A single TV device, which connects to the PC on a USB bus, could have one or more I2C buses internally to implement tuning and remote control features. Media devices appear to the kernel as a group of independent devices. Each device implements a function which could be shared by one or more functions. As a result these devices depend on each other to provide a complete media service. For instance, Tuner is shared by analog and digital TV functions.

Linux Media drivers that drive one single media TV stick are a diversified group. Drivers that provide Analog and digital TV functions have to coordinate access to their shared functions. Further more, some devices provide multiple almost-independent functions. USB and PCI core work to allow multiple drivers to handle those almost-independent functions. For instance, snd-usb-audio driver will handle USB Audio Class devices, including some em28x devices, as it provides an independent UAC interface, while analog and digital TV are provided via another interface.

This talk will go over the existing media driver sharing constructs, their deficiencies, and discuss what is being done to solve the sharing problems across media drivers as well as cases when non-media drivers such as the snd-usb-audio driver is in the mix.

Speakers
SK

Shuah Khan

Sr. Linux Kernel Developer, Samsung SRA OSG
Shuah Khan is a Senior Linux Kernel Developer at Samsung's Open Source Group. She is a Linux Kernel Contributor who focuses on IOMMU, DMA, Linux Power Management, and PCIe, in addition to helping with stable release kernel maintenance testing and bug fixes. Shuah has several years of Unix kernel development experience. She has also contributed to OpenHPI, and LLDP projects. She has presented at several internal conferences, and will be speaking... Read More →


Thursday May 1, 2014 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Willow Glen II/III

2:00pm

Using Chroot to Bring Linux applications to Android - Mike Anderson, PTR Group
Android is considered by many as the most successful Linux distribution ever.  However, the lack of many Linux libraries makes moving Linux applications to the Android environment a difficult proposition.  In this presentation we will discuss the use of the Android chroot mechanism to create a Linux oasis in the middle of your Android platform.  You'll see techniques for moving applications, including graphical applications, into Android from an ARM-based Linux distribution that will allow both Android and Linux applications to be running simultaneously on the same device.  These techniques will support anything from running a single application all the way to installing a full-blown Linux distribution complete with X onto the Android device.

Speakers
avatar for Michael E Anderson

Michael E Anderson

Chief Scientist, The PTR Group, inc.
Mike Anderson is currently CTO and Chief Scientist for The PTR Group, Inc. With over 39 years in the embedded and real-time computing industry, Mike works with a number of RTOS, Linux and Android-based devices in applications ranging from satellites and robotics to SCADA platforms. However, his focus over the past few years has been the use of Linux and Android in embedded sensor applications and the deployment of the Internet of Things.


Thursday May 1, 2014 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Blossom Hill I & II

2:00pm

Buildroot: What's New? - Thomas Petazzoni, Free Electrons
Buildroot is a simple, efficient and easy-to-use embedded Linux build system. It can generate a cross-compilation toolchain, a Linux kernel image, bootloader images and more importantly a root filesystem image with many userspace libraries and programs. Based on cross-compilation, Buildroot supports 1200 userspace packages, including GStreamer, X.org, Qt, Gtk, Python, Wayland and more. Used by Google, many SoC vendors, and numerous embedded systems makers, Buildroot is backed by a strong and active open-source community, that publishes stable releases every three months.

Since the last talk given at ELC two years ago, Buildroot has grown significantly, gained a lot of popularity and a number of new interesting features have been integrated. Through this talk, we would like to share a little introduction on how to use Buildroot, and then cover the new important features and improvements that have been implemented during the last two years. This talk is intended to be useful both to existing Buildroot users who want to learn more about the latest improvements, and to newcomers who are interested in discovering Buildroot capabilities.

Plenty of time will be left at the end of the talk for an open discussion with the audience: sharing each other's experience, discussing Buildroot strengths and weaknesses, etc.

Speakers
avatar for Thomas Petazzoni

Thomas Petazzoni

CTO and Embedded Linux Engineer, Free Electrons
Thomas Petazzoni is CTO and embedded Linux engineer at Free Electrons. He contributes to the support of Marvell ARM processors in the Linux kernel, and is a major contributor to the Buildroot embedded Linux build system. As part of his Buildroot work, Thomas has done extensive contributions to the code building cross-compilation toolchains and the code importing existing cross-compilation toolchains in Buildroot.


Thursday May 1, 2014 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Salon III

2:00pm

Improving Performance Of A WebKit Port MIPS Platform - Adrián Pérez de Castro, Igalia
The MIPS processor cores are widely used in embedded platforms, including TVs and set-top-boxes. In most of those platforms dedicated graphics hardware exists but it may be specialized for its use in audio and video signal processing: rendering of web content has to be done in software. We implemented optimizations for the software-based QPainter renderer to improve the performance of Qt —including QtWebKit— in MIPS processors. The target platform was the modern 74kf cores, which include new SIMD instructions suitable for graphics operations (alpha blending, color space conversion and JPEG image decoding), and also for non-graphics operations: string functions were also improved. Our figures estimate that web pages are rendered up to 30% faster using hand-coded assembler fast-paths for those operations.

Speakers
avatar for Adrián Pérez de Castro

Adrián Pérez de Castro

Software Engineer, Igalia
I am a Software Engineer and member of the Compilers team at Igalia, where I have been working on Javascript engines and also collaborating with the Browsers team in the maintenance of the WebKitGTK+. In the past I have been part of a number of projects both in desktop and embedded environments around GNOME and MeeGo, and. I have been a speaker at FOSDEM, DebConf and smaller events organized by local LUGs.


Thursday May 1, 2014 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Salon IV

2:00pm

Porting Linux to a New Architecture - Marta Rybczynska, Kalray
Porting Linux to a new architecture is a challenge on its own. The process requires knowledge of different kernel subsystems at the same time as the general overview. Additionally, Linux is complete only with its applications and libraries. They add their own requirements and platform dependencies. This talk shows the main points learned porting Linux not just to a new architecture, but multicore and distributed one of the Kalray MPPA256 processor. This includes advanced debug techniques, hard points in the kernel and in the interactions between kernel and user space. It shows also the points specific to the architecture like the device drivers, board support and more. It is rich in examples showing not only what, but also why something was done.

Speakers
MR

Marta Rybczynska

Software Engineer, Kalray
Marta Rybczynska has network security background and 10 years of experience in embedded development. She has been working with embedded operating systems like Linux and various real-time ones, system libraries and frameworks up to user interfaces. Currently she is working at Kalray on the device drivers and operating systems on the massive multicore MPPA256 platform. She has experience with presentations on both scientific and free software... Read More →


Thursday May 1, 2014 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Salon I/II

3:00pm

Multi Persona Android - Oren Laadan, Cellrox
Android devices -smartphones and tablets- are increasingly ubiquitous, used for work, personal, and geographic mobility needs. While the usage model (one app at a time) can naturally extend to consolidate these uses, the ability to do so securely is missing. Hypervisors are unsuitable for the task, and userspace sandboxes offer little in terms of security. This talk will present a solution for running multiple virtual Android instances on a single device, for example one personal and one for work. We leverage lightweight virtualization to introduce true multi-persona functionality combining security, performance, and usability, with remarkably rapid system bring up times. The talk will describe how Android drivers (e.g. Binder, Wakelocks) are handled and how hardware is properly multiplexed, including a live demo showing two
virtual phones running simultaneously on one phone.

This presentation is intended for anyone interested in Android security and virtualization. The talk is especially relevant for attendees interested in business oriented solutions for Android that require higher level of security and isolation.

This presentation will help Android developers and Android product managers understand the challenges of creating a truly secure environment in Android and will hopefully provide them and the companies that they work for with the tools to correctly assess the level of security in their products.  


Speakers
OL

Oren Laadan

Dr. Oren Laadan is the CTO of Cellrox, a startup providing virtualization for multi-persona solutions on smartphones and tablets. Prior to Cellrox, he was a researcher at Columbia University focusing on computer systems, broadly defined, including virtualization, operating systems, security, reliability, and mobile computing. Oren developed Linux Checkpoint-Restart (linux-cr), based in part on his research on virtualization and application... Read More →


Thursday May 1, 2014 3:00pm - 3:50pm
Willow Glen II/III

3:00pm

Multiwindow Support on Android - Andrzej Wieczorek & Mikel Echegoyen, Tieto
With new Android products having increasing screen resolution and CPU performance the single application and single window model feels insufficient and limiting. New Android products with large screen such as tablets, TVs and 2-in-1s could provide users with extended multiwindow and multi-application experiences without having to modify off the shelf applications. In our presentation we present a multiwindow solution for Android and detail the architecture and design decisions and share some our guesses for future support of Multiwindow natively in Android. The solution will be demonstrated live in multiple products and architectures, while showcasing the performance without platform specific or proprietary acceleration. Furthermore we will be announcing during the talk the availability of this solution as an open source project.

The described solution will be open sourced and announced during Android Builders Summit, and made available to the ecosystem with instructions for integration with AOSP releases, facilitating creation of rom images for AOSP supported devices.  

Speakers
avatar for Andrzej Wieczorek

Andrzej Wieczorek

Business Developer, Tieto
Andrzej Wieczorek brings his knowledge of constrained embedded devices and gateways being a part of IoT - ways they are built, communicate with each other and create value out of the data. | | Niklas Kvarnstrom brings his know-how of the M2M market, looks at possible innovation opportunities and thinks outside the box in order to solve problems arising (regarding sensors, gateways, device integration points, functions for Telematics Service... Read More →


Thursday May 1, 2014 3:00pm - 3:50pm
Blossom Hill I & II

3:00pm

Collaborative GPL Enforcement Through Non-Profit Entities - Bradley M. Kuhn, Software Freedom Conservancy
Software Freedom Conservancy announced last year a renewed effort for cross-project collaborative GPL compliance efforts, including copyright holders from BusyBox, Linux, and Samba. Conservancy uses an internal system of communication and collaboration to take input from stakeholders to discuss and engage in compliance activity to ensure compliance with the GPL throughout the technology industry and particularly in the embedded device market. Compliance with the GPL is the responsibility of copyright holders of the software, and Conservancy helps those copyright holders pursue the work, so those developers can focus on coding. In this talk, the President of Conservancy will discuss how Conservancy handles compliance matters, what matters it focuses on, and how the copyright holders that work with Conservancy engage in a collaborative effort to ensure compliance with the GPL.

Speakers
BM

Bradley M. Kuhn

President & Distinguished Technologist, Software Freedom Conservancy
Bradley M. Kuhn helped found Software Freedom Conservancy in 2006, became its Executive Director in 2010, and is currently Conservancy's President and Distinguished Technologist. Kuhn additionally volunteers on Free Software Foundation's Board of Directors, and was previously FSF's Executive Director. Kuhn has been a volunteer contributor and organizer in the Software Freedom Movement since 1992. Kuhn focused his last 15 years on FLOSS... Read More →


Thursday May 1, 2014 3:00pm - 3:50pm
Salon III

3:00pm

Productizing Telephony and Audio in a GNU/Linux (Sailfish OS) Smartphone - Martti Piirainen, Tieto
Telephony and audio are among the trickiest areas to "get right" when developing a smartphone. For example, the set of expected features and mandatory specifications are massive, and cellular operators have interesting quirks in their networks and SIM cards. All of these hurdles need to be overcome for a consumer grade product, but GNU/Linux devices can benefit from some of the hard work already done in similar Android devices. This presentation showcases two areas in the hardware adaptation of Sailfish OS: The telephony stack - built around oFono and the Android RIL, and the audio stack - built around PulseAudio and the Android HAL.

This presentation is an overview of how we extended and integrated oFono and PulseAudio in the context of an existing Android base layer. More generally, this presentation is a success story on making a consumer device, the "Jolla" smartphone, which is based on GNU/Linux and (in some areas) Android components. It is commercially available since November 2013.

Speakers
avatar for Martti Piirainen

Martti Piirainen

Sofware Architect, Tieto Product Development Services
Martti Piirainen is a software architect at Tieto Product Development Services. He is a cellular telephony expert and has worked on the whole stack (modem protocols, modem integration, middleware, UI) for more than ten years. Much of his work has been customer proprietary, but recently he has contributed to oFono and other GPL'd parts of Sailfish OS. Martti received a computer science degree in Berlin (Germany) in 2003, and works in Oulu... Read More →


Thursday May 1, 2014 3:00pm - 3:50pm
Salon I/II

3:00pm

What's going on with SPI - Mark Brown, Linaro
After having been largely static since its original integration the SPI subsystem has recently entered a period of more active development - new system designs, greater performance requirements and advances within the kernel as a whole have been placing increasing demands on the subsystem. This talk will give an overview of the status of the subsystem, the problems it and its users face and how they are being dealt with to help keep the hardware fully occupied under load while minimising delays, CPU utilisation and duplication of development effort.

Speakers
avatar for Mark Brown

Mark Brown

Kernel Working Geoup Technical Lead, Linaro
Mark is the maintainer of several subsystems in the Linux kernel, primarily for embedded systems, and has spoken at a number of conferences on related topics. He is the maintainer of the Linaro Stable Kernel, supporting production deployment of the latest features for ARM. Prior to working a Linaro he was the lead for Linux at Wolfson Microelectronics, supporting system integration both upstream and in leading consumer electronics products.


Thursday May 1, 2014 3:00pm - 3:50pm
Salon IV

4:00pm

Tuning Android For Low RAM - Chris Simmonds, 2net
The 4.4 KitKat release includes the results of “Project Svelte”: a set of tweaks to the operating system to make it run more easily on devices with around 512 MiB RAM. This is likely to be especially important for people working with “Embedded Android”, that is, implementing Android on devices that are not smart phones or tablets. However, “Project Svelte” is not a simple “on/off” configuration setting. It is a range tuning options throughout the Android and Linux kernel stacks. In this talk I describe the practical steps you can take to apply these changes to a real-life example device, including tuning the size of the Dalvik heap, enabling KSM (Kernel samepage merging) and swap to zRAM.

Speakers
avatar for Chris Simmonds

Chris Simmonds

Consultant, 2net
Chris Simmonds is a freelance consultant and trainer who has been using Linux in embedded systems for over 15 years. He is the author of the book “Mastering Embedded Linux Programming”, and is a frequent presenter at open source and embedded conferences, including the Embedded Linux Conference and Embedded World. He has been running training courses in embedded Linux since 2002 and has delivered hundreds of sessions to many well-known... Read More →


Thursday May 1, 2014 4:00pm - 4:50pm
Blossom Hill I & II

4:00pm

Kernel USB Gadget Configfs Interface - Matt Porter, Linaro
Kernel USB gadget configfs interface (Matt Porter, Linaro) - The Linux kernel has long had support for USB peripheral or "gadget" drivers. In the past, the creation and configuration of composite USB gadgets has required custom kernel drivers in order to support arbitrary combinations of USB device functions. In this presentation, Matt Porter will review the history of kernel gadget APIs and userspace APIs for creating USB gadgets. He will review the USB gadget configfs API and how it can be used to create arbitrary USB composite gadgets using existing kernel USB functions. Matt will then introduce use of the libusbg userspace gadget library by demonstration of several USB composite gadget examples.

Thursday May 1, 2014 4:00pm - 4:50pm
Salon III

4:00pm

Ubuntu Touch Internals - Ricardo Salveti de Araujo, Ubuntu Touch low level stack
Ubuntu Touch is the new Ubuntu-based OS for phones and tablets. Announced at the beggining of 2013, it gives a new UI and design proposal, but also a new way of developing and supporting many different devices, using either the Android HAL or the traditional Linux stack to build the platform. This talk will go over the Ubuntu Touch internals, presenting the technical decisions and also the work that was done to bootstrap this new platform (camera, radio, video decode, GLES and etc) and the future chalenges to support a single stack across mobile and the traditional desktop.

Speakers
RS

Ricardo Salveti de Araujo

Ubuntu Core Developer, Canonical
Ricardo Salveti is an Ubuntu Core developer, and one of the main developers for the Ubuntu Touch low level stack. Works since 2010 at Canonical, and was previously allocated to Linaro as the Linaro Development Platform Tech Lead. Works with free software since 2003, contributing to many different open source projects over the time.


Thursday May 1, 2014 4:00pm - 4:50pm
Salon IV

4:00pm

webOS, An Openembedded Use Case - Iyad Qumei, LG Electronics
WebOS is a web-centric platform. The platform consists of Open WebOS and Enyo, both of which are open source projects. The platform relies on the Linux kernel, and various components to generate bootable image. Openembedded is used for compiling various components, and building the final image. Extensive customization was made to OpenEmbedded to accommodate WebOS requirements. This paper describes the use of Openembedded to build WebOS, including the customization work.

Speakers
avatar for Iyad Qumei

Iyad Qumei

Senior Software Engineer, LG Electronics
Experience with Linux and open source since 2000.  Worked on many aspects of the Linux distributions, including board bring-up, kernel customization, drivers development, and distribution preparation.  Recently worked on the deployment and customization of the Montavista distribution for various embedded systems, including mobile and carrier grade systems.  Currently working on the design and creation of webOS distribution with Openembedded.


Thursday May 1, 2014 4:00pm - 4:50pm
Salon I/II

4:50pm

5:10pm